banner search whats new site index home

Tinicum Township


Tinicum Township municipal offices are located at 163 Municipal Road, Pipersville PA 18947; phone: 610-294-9154.

48 home sales for the 12 months ending 10/31/2016**
Median Sold Price: $425,000

Questions?
Contact The John McClintock Team, Licensed in PA & NJ
Keller Williams Real Estate, Newtown, PA
Isaac Stover House, ca. 1850s, River Road south of Geigel Hill Road, Tinicum Township, Bucks County, PA, National Register

Photo: Isaac Stover House, ca. 1850s, River Road south of Geigel Hill Road, Tinicum Township, Bucks County, PA. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. Photographed by User:PattiParker (own work), 2012, [cc-by-3.0 (creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons, accessed April, 2014.

Historic Tinicum Township

Tinicum has vestiges of 7 historic villages, two of which (Erwinna and Uhlerstown) are on the National Register of Historic Places. The others are: Clay Ridge, Ottsville, Smithtown, Sundale, and Tinicum. Also the Point Pleasant National Historic District straddles the border with neighboring Plumstead Township. Tinicum is home to three registered covered bridges (Erwinna, Frankenfield, and Uhlerstown) as well as the Ridge Valley National Historic District.

Ottsville's (formerly Red Hill) Red Hill Church and School were listed on the National Register in 1978.

Tinicum is one of very few townships whose boundaries have remained virtually unchanged since it was organized in 1738. It is written that the name Tinicum is a corruption of an Indian word "tennicunk" meaning "island" or "along the edge of the island." Early European settlers were primarily English and Irish. Notable among them was Edward Marshall, the notable (or notorious) protagonist in the famous "Walking Purchase" incident that took place in 1737. He lived at one time in Easton, moving to an Island in the Delaware River at Tinicum after an Indian attack killed his wife and unborn child. Indians harassed him after the walking purchase. During one of the attacks a son Peter (the oldest) was also killed. Subsequently, Marshall served in the Revolutionary War, returning to the island and becoming a recluse, living out his remaining years with his second wife. He is said to have fathered no less than 21 children. He died in 1789. He was 79 years old. One legend suggests that the Delaware Canal Towpath, across from Marshall Island, is haunted by the ghost of his wife, Elizabeth.

Today, Marshall's island is called "Eagle Island" and is owned by the Boy Scouts of America.

The following is excerpted from a Boy Scouts guide to "Treasure Island" which is adjacent to Marshall Island:

"Treasure Island and the other islands of the middle and upper Delaware River were formed from enormous quantities of boulders, gravel, sand, and silt carried down by flood waters from the melting of the North American ice sheet of the last Ice Age over nine thousand years ago. The ice sheet had covered eastern North America as far south as New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Locally, it reached down the old Delaware River Valley to within thirty miles of what was to become Treasure Island.

In the centuries before the coming of the first European settlers, Treasure Island was inhabited by the Unami sub-tribe of the Lenni Lenape Indians. Their arrow points have been found in several places in the Island's silty soil."

**Information is curated from a variety of sources and, while deemed reliable, is not guaranteed.
Copyright © 1997-2016 • The Gombach Group • www.gombach.com • 10042 • Privacy