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Barnett Bobb Log House


Barnett Bob Log House, National Register of Historic Places, York, PA

Photo: Barnett Bob Log House, National Register of Historic Places, York, PA

The Barnett Bobb Log House (rear of 157 West Market Street) was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Portions of the content on this web page were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document [1]. Adaptation copyright 2009, The Gombach Group.

Description

The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) is a two-story, restored dwelling which is typical of the style of construction used in the early homes of York and surrounding areas. The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) is situated behind the General Gates House and Golden Plough Tavern which is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) is larger than the average log house of the period; it is two stories with four rooms and a hall on the first floor and a full, second floor attic. The dovetailed type of corner construction is in contrast to the more commonly found notched corner style of construction. Certain features common to log houses of the early nineteenth century are also evident in this house. These include square logs, stone and mortar chinking between the exposed logs, with whitewashed exterior and interior walls; typical vertical board partitions inside with simple beaded edges; one chimney and a small fireplace in the living-dining area which suggests an outside kitchen for cooking.

All walls of the Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) are original. A number of logs in the east wall were replaced to the second floor level, because a shed addition to the house was removed during restoration. The remainder of the logs are original. At the time of restoration, it was discovered that the log house had been converted from a single family to a two-family dwelling at some undetermined time. Marks left by a stairway were evident on the interior north gable wall. Also, marks of the original chimney were left on the south wall. In the ceiling, the ends of all partition boards remained after the dividing partitions had been sawed away. One original window was uncovered and served as a model for restoration. The entire restoration was thus based on construction details uncovered when plaster and lath were removed.

At the time of restoration, the house was moved several blocks, from its original location on South Pershing Avenue to its present site. The reason for its relocation was the planned enlargement of a nearby high school. Its present location is in close proximity to two other important historic buildings in the city's geographic and historical core. Therefore, the Barnett Bobb Log House's present position, though not, original is appropriate.

TheBarnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) is furnished in the style of the average German home in this area, in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth, centuries.

Significance

The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) was built in 1811-1812. This date is documented by the fact that Barnett Bobb, its builder, bought the land on which it stands in 1811 and paid taxes on a dwelling with the dimensions of this house in 1812.

The Bobb family arrived in Philadelphia in 1754 from Germany and some years later appeared in York County. Ludwick Bobb was a member of two militia companies of the revolutionary era. His son Johann Bernhard, who later anglicized his name to Barnett, was the builder of this house. The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) stayed in the Bobb family for a period after Barnett's death. During the last century several different families have lived in the dwelling. Heads of household have included a farmer, a tip-staff, a tanner, a coachman, and a teamster.

The Barnett Bobb Log House (Old Log House) is distinctive for several reasons:

1. Exposed log construction with stone and mortar chinking between logs with white washed exterior and interior walls.

2. Dovetailed type of corner construction as compared to more common notched corner type of construction.

3. Typical square logs as generally found in early log houses.

4. Unusual size which is larger than the usual one-room, one-story log houses.

5. Two story design with four rooms and a hall on the first floor and a full second floor attic.

6. Typical vertical board partitions inside with simple beaded edges.

7. One chimney and small fireplace in the living-dining area which suggests an outside kitchen for cooking.

Reference

Joint State Government Commission Study on Historic Sites. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1965.

  1. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, prepared by Harvey Freedenberg and Sally McMurray, Barnett Bobb Log House, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

Barnett Bobb Log House Map

**Information is curated from a variety of sources and, while deemed reliable, is not guaranteed.
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