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Mainville


Beginnings [1]

Mainville was at one time a thriving village, having the furnace and two mills, the forge, three stores and two hotels. Part of this prosperity came from the building of the Catawissa railroad, between 1832 and 1838. Many parts of the line were graded and the high trestle bridge over the creek and gap between Nescopeck and Catawissa mountains was constructed at a great cost. The work ceased until 1853, when it was resumed, but the entire structure had rotted, necessitating its complete rebuilding. This gave more work for local contractors, and a few years later the Danville, Hazleton & Wilkes-Barre railroad added to the temporary prosperity of the town while in process of construction. Both of these roads now have tall steel bridges across the ravine and creek, the Reading (or Catawissa) railroad structure being directly over the old one, the piers of stone still standing in fair condition, but not supporting the new work in any way.

The "Shuman Hotel" was owned by that family for a century. It is no longer a public house.

The "Mainville Hotel" is an old-fashioned, roomy structure in the lower part of the town and has a reputation for good service and ample accommodations. It was kept by Boyd R. Yetter for many years. W.M. Longenberger was postmaster, and also had a store here. Another merchant is A.F. Deaner. P.O.S. of A. Camp No.484 had a fine brick meeting hall here. There was also a new frame high school in the town.

There were but three veterans of the Civil War living in Mainville: William Utt, Henry Bredbender and Martin Van Buren Kostenbauder.

  1. Historical and Biographical Annals of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, J.H.Beers & Co., 1915.

Mainville Map

Street Names
Firehall Lane • Main-Mifflin Road • Mainville Drive • Route 339

**Information is curated from a variety of sources and, while deemed reliable, is not guaranteed.
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