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North Third Street Historic District


The North Third Street Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. Portions of the content on this web page were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [†] Adaptation copyright © 2011, The Gombach Group.

Description

The North Third Street Historic District in Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri consists of several square blocks of primarily residential properties, covering approximately seventeen acres. The majority of buildings in the North Third Street Historic District are dwellings or related outbuildings. However, ten commercial buildings, one water treatment plant, one library, one fraternal meeting hall, and one church are also located within the North Third Street Historic District boundaries. The houses in the North Third Street Historic District range from small, vernacular Hall and Parlor houses to large, high-style Greek Revival and Victorian mansions. The North Third Street Historic District retains a high level of integrity. Altogether, there are 84 resources in the North Third Street Historic District. Of those 84 resources, 61 buildings, one structure and one site are contributing. In addition, four buildings in the North Third Street Historic District are already listed on the National Register and are not counted in the list of contributing buildings. Contributing buildings in the North Third Street Historic District date from ca.1843 to 1935. Overall, the resources in the North Third Street Historic District reflect citywide patterns of architectural and social development.

Elaboration

The North Third Street Historic District contains some of the oldest houses in Louisiana. Part of the North Third Street Historic District is located within the original town of Louisiana, which was platted in 1819 and part is located in the Baker Claim, which was platted in 1867. The North Third Street Historic District is located due north of the downtown business area and abuts the northern boundary of the Georgia Street Historic District between North Third and North Fourth Streets. The North Third Street Historic District is a separate district from the Georgia Street Historic District because the properties in the North Third Street Historic District are predominately residential whereas the Georgia Street Historic District contains primarily commercial buildings. The North Third Street Historic District is roughly bounded by Noyes Street on the north, Tennessee Street on the south, North Fourth Street on the west and North Water Street on the east. The boundaries encompass the intact areas of the neighborhood, which are north of Georgia Street and east of North Fourth Street. The majority of buildings in the North Third Street Historic District are dwellings or related outbuildings. However, ten commercial buildings, one water treatment plant, one library, one fraternal meeting hall, and one church are also located within the district boundaries. The houses in the North Third Street Historic District range from small, vernacular Hall and Parlor houses to large, high-style Greek Revival and Victorian mansions.

The buildings in the North Third Street Historic District exhibit a good cross-section of construction dates and building types. Three major periods of development are represented. The district contains 7 properties from Period I: Early Settlement: From Trading Post to Commercial Center: 1818-1865, 33 properties from Period II: Post-War Development and Prosperity: 1866-1900, and 20 properties from Period III: Twentieth Century Development: 1901-1955. Property types are also well represented. Contributing buildings include 12 Victorian houses, 6 I-houses, 4 high-style Greek Revival houses, 4 Commercial buildings, 3 Italianate residences, 3 Bungalows, 3 Gabled Ells, 3 Foursquares, 3 Linear Plan houses, 2 Gable Front houses, and 2 Period Revival buildings. The North Third Street Historic District also includes one contributing structure — a cast iron Victorian fence and one contributing site. The numerous stone retaining walls, historic plantings, gridded street pattern and the stone gutters along North Third Street are counted as one contributing site. The resources in the North Third Street Historic District reflect city-wide patterns of architectural and social development.

Approximately 11% (7 out of 63) of the primary buildings in the North Third Street Historic District were constructed during Louisiana's first period of development from 1818-1865. Four of the six houses from Period I are contributing buildings and one is already listed on the National Register. Three of these buildings are very large, high-style, brick houses and all five contributing buildings were constructed by prominent Louisiana businessmen.

The earliest contributing house in the North Third Street Historic District is located at 300 North Main Street and was built circa 1843 by physician William C. Hardin. It is a two-story, frame I-house with a large rear ell. With the exception of an oriel window with a conical roof on the south elevation, which was added in the late nineteenth century, the Hardin House has little ornamentation. The Hardin House is one of a few houses in the North Third Street Historic District that have remained in the same family throughout most of its history. Unlike the Hardin House, three of the houses in the North Third Street Historic District that date from Period I, are large, high-style brick mansions. The James H. Johnson House (ca.1861) and the Luce-Dyer House (ca.1857) were both built by Powhatan Baird and Levi Ruggles. Although the houses are distinctly different, both have elaborate Italianate detailing, which is similar in design. The Luce-Dyer House (also known as the Stark-Carlson House) was individually listed on the National Register in 1982.[1] The other high-style house from Period I, the Edward G. McQuie House (ca.1858), is one of the largest and most intact Greek Revival houses in Louisiana.

Buildings constructed during Louisiana's second major period of development, Post-War Development: 1866-1900, demonstrate the shift towards Victorian styling and are representative of the town's growth and prosperity in the late nineteenth century. More than half of the buildings in the North Third Street Historic District (33 of 63) were constructed during the second half of the nineteenth century. Brick continued to be the dominant building material in the district and was employed on both houses and commercial buildings. However all three of the stone houses in North Third Street Historic District were also erected during this period.

The buildings constructed in the North Third Street Historic District during Louisiana's second period of development include both high-style and vernacular houses and a few commercial buildings. Houses with Greek Revival detailing continued to be built in the North Third Street Historic District for several decades following the Civil War. By the late nineteenth century, however, Victorian styling had supplanted Greek Revival as the preferred architectural style for dwellings in the North Third Street Historic District.

Eight of the 33 buildings constructed between 1866 and 1900 have varying degrees of Greek Revival styling. Many of these buildings are I-houses with Greek Revival detailing, including flat, stone lintels, side-facing gable roofs with cornice returns, and central bay front porches. All were constructed prior to 1885. The house at 215 North Fourth Street is one of the most intact examples of Greek Revival styling in the North Third Street Historic District from the period. It was constructed in 1874 for lumber merchant, Marcus Dreyfus.

Gothic Revival and Italianate were the first two sub-styles of the Victorian movement to appear in Louisiana. The only church in the North Third Street Historic District, St. Joseph's Catholic Church, has Gothic Revival detailing and was constructed in 1874. Constructed of brick, it has pointed-arch window and door openings, a three-story square tower, and stone detailing. One house in the North Third Street Historic District has Gothic Revival ornamentation. The John H. Gamble House, constructed circa 1874, has a steeply pitched front cross gable with decorative bargeboards and drip-mold window detailing. The house's Queen Anne style wraparound porch was added in the early twentieth century.

Although the purest examples of Italianate styling in the North Third Street Historic District were constructed prior to the Civil War, several vernacular houses with Italianate detailing were constructed in the district in the 1870s. One such house is located at 402 North Third Street. The Dr. George H. Bralley House is a two-story Gabled Ell house with a wide, bracketed cornice. After years of sitting empty and neglected, the house, which has a new owner, is receiving a full rehabilitation.

Six of the 33 houses constructed during Louisiana's second period of development can be classified as Queen Anne. Typical of the Queen Anne sub-style, most of these houses have irregular plans, complex roof lines, projecting bays and elaborate applied ornamentation. The house in the North Third Street Historic District that most exemplifies the Queen Anne sub-style is the Frank Boehm, Jr. House at 200 North Fourth Street. The house has multiple roof lines, a three-story tower, patterned shingle siding and a wraparound front porch.

The largest number of buildings constructed during Louisiana's second period of development are best classified as vernacular dwellings. Thirteen of the 34 buildings constructed between 1866 and 1900 are modest dwellings without any specific architectural styling. Included in this group are a Single Pen house, two Hall and Parlor houses, four Gabled Ell houses, and eight I-houses. The commercial buildings constructed in the district in the late nineteenth century include two, two-part commercial blocks and two multi-story warehouses. All are vernacular buildings with little or no ornamentation.

During Louisiana's third period of development, 1901-1955, 30% (20 of 63) of the primary buildings in the North Third Street Historic District were built. Although Louisiana's population declined in the early twentieth century, the North Third Street District continued to be a popular residential area. However, the new houses constructed after the turn of the twentieth century tend to be much more modest in size and in ornamentation than those constructed in the late nineteenth century and the area's new residents tended to be average citizens instead of wealthy, prominent businessmen.

Although several Queen Anne style houses were built in the early decades of the twentieth century, approximately half of the buildings constructed in the North Third Street Historic District during Louisiana's third period of development reflected the new styles and building types that gained popularity throughout the country in the early twentieth century. Three Foursquares, three Bungalows and three Period Revival buildings were built in the district in the first half of the twentieth century. The three Foursquares and one of the Bungalows appear to have been constructed by the same builder. All four houses have distinctive dark red brick, all have similar detailing and all are located on North Third Street. Three Period Revival buildings also were constructed in the North Third Street Historic District in the early twentieth century and one of those three buildings is known to be architect designed. The Louisiana Public Library was designed by the noted St. Louis architectural firm of Mauran, Russell and Garden and was dedicated in 1905.[2] It is a stone, Gothic Revival style building.

Non-contributing buildings in the North Third Street Historic District are post-1955 buildings or pre-1955 buildings, which have been extensively altered and no longer retain integrity. However, the North Third Street Historic District as a whole retains a high level of integrity; 67 of the 84 resources in the district are contributing or already listed on the National Register. 51 of the 65 primary buildings and 10 of the 14 outbuildings in the North Third Street Historic District are contributing resources. Four resources are already individually listed. There have been very few buildings constructed in the district since the period of significance. As a result, the district looks much like it did in the early twentieth century. As a group, the resources in the North Third Street Historic District reflect the development of the neighborhood and of the city of Louisiana.

Significance

The North Third Street Historic District is significant in the area of Community Planning and Development. The neighborhood is one of the earliest residential areas of Louisiana; it served as a predominantly residential area throughout the period of significance; and it continues to function as such today. The neighborhood was also home to many of the town's most prominent residents. The buildings of the North Third Street Historic District form a cohesive grouping of intact historic resources and as such are significant in the area of Architecture. The buildings in the North Third Street Historic District reflect mainstream architectural styles and types, which were in vogue during its long period of significance. There are eleven different historic property types. Of the 84 resources in the North Third Street Historic District, 63 are contributing resources. The period of significance runs from ca.1843, the construction date of the earliest house in the district to 1935, the construction date of the latest contributing building in the district. The North Third Street Historic District is one of the most intact residential neighborhoods in Louisiana. It looks and functions today much as it did during the period of significance.

Elaboration

The North Third Street Historic District is located in one of the oldest neighborhoods in Louisiana, Missouri. Some of the earliest houses in Louisiana were constructed within the North Third Street Historic District boundaries; many of them were built by the town's early settlers. The North Third Street Historic District is located just to the north of Louisiana's historic commercial area. North Third Street, which is also known as State Highway 79, developed early in the town's existence as the major north-south thoroughfare through Louisiana, and it continues to serve as a major arterial street today. The close proximity to the downtown area and its high profile location made the district an attractive neighborhood for many of the town's prominent citizens including doctors, lawyers, bankers, and merchants of all types. In addition, the neighborhood functioned as a tight-knit community throughout the period of significance in part due to the close relationships between many of the property owners. Several of the houses in the North Third Street Historic District were owned by members of the same family, and many of the houses stayed in the same family's ownership for many years, passed down through the generations.

The North Third Street Historic District is also significant as a cohesive grouping of intact historic buildings. In addition, the buildings in the North Third Street Historic District reflect the architectural development of Louisiana, and they provide representative examples of each of the dominant architectural styles and types in Louisiana. As in many areas of town, it is not unusual to see a mid-nineteenth century Greek Revival house next to an early twentieth century Bungalow. The neighborhood grew at a steady pace from the mid-nineteenth century through the early decades of the twentieth century. By the 1920s, almost all of the vacant lots in the area had been filled. In fact, some of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century houses were constructed on lots that had been occupied by earlier houses.

Of the 84 resources in the North Third Street Historic District, there are 51 contributing houses or commercial buildings, 10 contributing outbuildings, 1 contributing structure, 1 contributing site and 4 previously listed resources. Contributing buildings in the North Third Street Historic District date from ca.1843 to 1935; only a few buildings were constructed within the district boundaries after the period of significance.

Early Settlement: From Trading Post To Commercial Center: 1818-1865.

Although Louisiana was officially founded in 1819, no intact historic buildings that date prior to 1841 have been identified within the city limits. However, a few intact buildings from the middle decades of the nineteenth century are extant throughout Louisiana. No detailed maps of Louisiana from this period exist, but a few drawings from the period show the general development of the city by the mid-nineteenth century.

Seven of the houses in the North Third Street Historic District were built during the city's first period of development. Not only were several of these houses constructed by very prominent citizens, but also, they are some of the largest and most architecturally significant houses in Louisiana. The house located at 300 North Main Street is the earliest contributing house in the North Third Street Historic District. It was constructed ca.1843 for physician and merchant, William C. Hardin, who was one of the first doctors to settle in Louisiana.[3] Dr. Hardin's son, Neil Cameron Hardin, was a prominent attorney in Louisiana. He lived in the house until the mid-twentieth century and the house stayed in the Hardin family until the 1970s.

Like Dr. Hardin, the original owners of the other houses in the district from the period were also prominent businessmen. William Hardin's partner in the mercantile firm, I. N. Bryson and Co., built his house in the same block as the Hardin House. The Isaac N. Bryson Sr. House, built circa 1860, is a frame I-house located at 315 North Third Street. To the north, Hardin's neighbors included riverboat captain and real estate developer James H. Johnson, real-estate developer, Silas Farber and grocer, Edward G. McQuie.

Three houses in the North Third Street Historic District, the James H. Johnson House, the Silas Farber House and the Luce-Dyer House, were constructed by local builders Powhatan Baird and Levi Ruggles.[4] The Johnson House, built circa 1861, is one of the most elaborate Italianate houses in Louisiana. Distinctive features of the house include a three-story square tower, large scroll-cut brackets at the roofline and arched top windows with cast iron frames. After Johnson's death in the mid-1860s, the Johnson House was owned by attorney and judge, Thomas J. C. Fagg, by the Vice-President of the Excelsior Milling Company, Joseph S. Irwin, and by Stark Nurseries executive, Paul S. Stark.

The Luce-Dyer House, located at 220 North Third Street, was also built by Powhatan Baird and Levi Ruggles, and it is also a landmark building in Louisiana.[5] This high-style Italianate house was originally constructed in the mid-1850s for Homer Luce, the son of wealthy tobacco farmer and merchant, William Luce. A Neo-Classical portico was added to the front of the house in the 1930s. However, as it was noted in the National Register nomination for the house, "The portico addition was accomplished with enough skill and taste to stand as an interesting example of how older picturesque houses were "classicized" to suit the tastes of the time, and other examples of similar remodelings can be seen throughout Missouri. Historic views of the house show it to be much more picturesque in its original form and a good example of the Italianate Style which by the late 1850s was supplanting the more conservative Federal and Greek Revival styles as the model of taste and achievement for pretentious houses in Missouri."[6]

Subsequent owners of the Luce-Dyer House included Missouri legislators, David P. Dyer and John B. Henderson and Judge Eugene W. Stark, grandson of the founder of Stark Brothers Nurseries.[7]

The Edward G. McQuie House, located at 405 North Third Street, is one of the most intact, nineteenth century Greek Revival houses in Louisiana. Constructed circa 1858, during the same period as the Farber, Johnson and Luce-Dyer houses, it provides a distinct contrast to the more elaborate Italianate houses that surround it.

Post-War Development And Prosperity: 1866-1900

During the second half of the twentieth century, Louisiana continued to grow, and the town developed into a prosperous commercial center. The Bird's Eye Map of Louisiana, which was published in 1876, shows the North Third Street District as substantially developed. None of the blocks in the district are vacant, and many have several buildings in each block. Furthermore, many of the buildings shown on the Bird's Eye Map are still extant in the North Third Street Historic District today. Of the thirty-three primary buildings that were constructed in the district between 1866 and 1900, twenty-eight were houses. Two industrial buildings, two commercial buildings and a church were also built in the district during Louisiana's second period of development.

The North Third Street Historic District continued in the late nineteenth century to be a popular location for the town's prominent citizens to build their homes. The houses built in the district during this period also demonstrate the lingering appeal of Greek Revival styling as well as the shift in architectural tastes towards Victorian styling. Approximately 32% of the houses built in the district during second half of the nineteenth century reflected some degree of Greek Revival styling. The majority of the Greek Revival houses in the North Third Street Historic District were built in the 1870s, but a few were also built in the early 1880s. By the mid-1880s, Victorian had become the dominant architectural style in Louisiana. Approximately 43% of the houses built during the town's second period of development have some degree of Victorian ornamentation. The Victorian houses built in the district in the 1870s and early 1880s reflect Italianate or Gothic Revival styling while the buildings built in late 1880s and 1890s tend to be fully realized examples of the Queen Anne style.

All three partners in the lumber firm, Dreyfus, Hill and Woracek, built houses in the district in the late nineteenth century. Interestingly, all three men built brick houses. Two are Greek Revival houses and the third is a Queen Anne house. The Ernest Woracek House (ca.1871), located at 202 North Third Street, is an example of a modest Greek Revival house. It is a two-story, three-bay brick house with a hip roof and a simple dentiled brick cornice. In contrast, the Marcus Dreyfus House, located at 215 North Fourth Street, is the largest and most high-style Greek Revival house built in the district after the Civil War. Constructed ca.1874, it is an imposing two-story, brick I-house with a symmetrical five-bay facade. The house's Greek Revival detailing consists of cast iron pedimented lintels, a large front door flanked by a rectangular transom and sidelights, a two-story, central bay front porch, a simple brick corbel table at the roofline and cornice returns on the gable ends. The house built by the third partner in the Dreyfus, Hill and Woracek Company, William F. Hill, is one of the largest Queen Anne houses in the North Third Street Historic District. Constructed ca.1889, the Hill House is a two-story brick house with multiple roof lines, projecting bay windows, decorative brickwork and scroll-cut bargeboards and roof brackets.

Louis, David and Adam Wald, the owners of Wald Brothers Dry Goods also built houses in the district in the early 1890s. The three Wald brothers' houses are located side-by-side on the east side of the 200 block of North Third Street. Not only did three members of the same family build these houses in the Queen Anne style, but also all three houses were almost identical when constructed. Each house has a limestone facade, a three-story corner tower with a conical roof and decorative shinglework in the gable ends. The Louis and David Wald Houses (217 and 221 North Third Street) are mirror images of each other with the corner towers on opposite ends of the facade. These two houses were joined by a two-story addition and converted into apartments in the 1920s. The Adam Wald House, located at 215 North Third Street was owned in the early twentieth century by P.F. Nord, president of the Nord-Buffum Pearl Button Company, and it is still a private residence today.

Two commercial buildings were built in the district in the late nineteenth century. Both buildings are located in the 100 block of North Main Street just north of Georgia Street, which is the main commercial street in Louisiana, and both are brick, Two-Part Commercial buildings. The building at 114-116 North Main Street was built circa 1891 and was used for by the W. Case Marble and Granite Company. Located directly across the street, the building at 105 North Main Street was built circa 1896 and was used as a carpenter shop for the LaCrosse Lumber Company.[8] Today, the building is used as a residence.

The Diamond Flour Manufacturing Warehouse is one of two industrial buildings constructed in the district during Louisiana's second period of development. It is a large brick building on the corner of North Water and Tennessee streets. The northern half of the building is three stories tall and has a gable roof; the southern half of the building is two stories tall and has a shed roof. The building, which was built circa 1884, is currently vacant, but it was used as a grain warehouse into the early twentieth century. The Hassler Brothers Vinegar Factory Building, located at the corner of North Main and Tennessee streets, was built in the late 1880s. It replaced an earlier one-story building, which housed the Hassler Brothers Vinegar Factory during its first years of operation. S.C. and W.J. Hassler opened their business in 1876. They manufactured vinegar and cider, and they were fresh produce brokers.[9] The Hassler Brothers Vinegar Factory Building was used in the early twentieth century by the Globe Feed Mill. Later, it was used for soft drink storage and auto repairs.[10]

St. Joseph's Catholic Church is the largest building and the only church in the North Third Street Historic District. This imposing brick and stone Gothic Revival building has pointed-arch windows on the side elevations that are filled with vibrantly colored stained glass windows. The building's square tower originally had a tall steeple. However, a fire in 1915 destroyed the steeple and seriously damaged the sanctuary.

Twentieth Century Development

With the turn of the twentieth century came a distinct shift in the character and the appearance of the North Third Street Historic District. Not only did the people who built houses in the district in the early twentieth century tend to be less affluent, but also, the houses they built were much more modest than those built by the neighborhood's earlier residents. The houses built in the early twentieth century in the district are mostly one to one-and-one-half story tall instead of two to two-and-one-half stories, and they are predominately frame buildings instead of brick or stone construction. Of the 20 buildings constructed in the district during Louisiana's third period of development, 15 were houses. Two commercial buildings, one industrial building and one institutional building were also built in the North Third Street Historic District in the early twentieth century.

Although the houses constructed in the district in the first decade of the twentieth century continued to reflect Victorian styling, they were much smaller than those built in the late nineteenth century. This fact was likely due, at least in part, to the fact that the houses were built on single parcels of land, which had originally been part of the property associated with the larger homes in the neighborhood.

The house located at 220 North Main Street is one of the most elaborate Victorian houses from the period. Constructed around 1906 for traveling salesman, J.W. Barre, the one-and-one-half story frame house has a hip roof with multiple cross gables, projecting bays with clipped corners and a wraparound porch.[11] Six other houses with Victorian styling were constructed in the district between 1901 and 1910. Five of the six are frame houses; one is brick. One house is one-story tall and the rest are one-and-one-half story houses.

All but one of the eight houses built in the North Third Street Historic District built after 1910 are markedly different than those built just a few years earlier. Three of the eight houses are Foursquares, three are Bungalows, and one is a Cape Cod. These houses demonstrate the shift away from Victorian styling towards new twentieth century styles and house types. In addition, these new houses were built or occupied early on by middle class people as opposed to merchants, lawyers or doctors.

The St. Joseph Rectory, located at 508b North Third Street, was one of the first Foursquare houses to be built in the neighborhood. Constructed in 1916 after a fire destroyed the first Rectory, the stark simplicity and the boxy form of this two-and-one-half story brick house must have been quite a contrast to the earlier homes in the district. The other Foursquare built in the North Third Street Historic District in the mid-1910s is located at 620 North Third Street. It was owned by William H. Murphy, who was listed in the 1907 City Directory as a cabinetmaker for the LaCrosse Lumber Company. Murphy also owned the house next door at 618 North Third Street. It is likely that some of the work on those two houses was done by Murphy himself. Although no records were found to confirm this hypothesis, the similarity of the St. Joseph Rectory, the William H. Murphy #2 House and two later houses suggests that all four houses were built by the same builder. The Ora G. Williams House, a one-and-one-half story brick Bungalow located at 318 North Third Street, is the best example of Craftsman styling in the North Third Street Historic District. The W.E. Holliday House, located at 302 North Third Street is the largest of the three Foursquare houses in the district. According to the current owner of the house, the house was operated as a rooming house by W.E. Holliday.[12]

Both of the commercial buildings constructed in the North Third Street Historic District in the early twentieth century were built for the LaCrosse Lumber Company. The Two-Part Commercial building located at 123 North Main Street originally served as the retail storefront and the offices for LaCrosse. However, in 1910, the LaCrosse Lumber Company built a new building to house its offices. The one-story brick building, which is located at 200 North Main Street, is one of the best examples of Classical Revival styling in Louisiana.

One industrial building was also constructed in the district during Louisiana's third period of development. The Louisiana Municipal Waterworks, which was built in 1935, actually consists of one building that faces North Main Street and another that faces North Water Street. Concrete settling tanks stretch between the two buildings. Both buildings are plain brick buildings with multi-light casement windows.

The Louisiana Public Library is one of only a few Gothic Revival buildings in Louisiana. Most of the other Gothic Revival buildings in town are churches. Built in 1904 with the help of a grant from Andrew Carnegie, the stone library building was designed by the prominent St. Louis architectural firm, Mauran, Russell and Garden.[13]

The North Third Street Historic District looks and functions today much as it did during the period of significance.

Endnotes

  1. Carol Brown Corey. "Luce-Dyer House National Register Nomination," 1982. (On file with the State Historic Preservation Office, Jefferson City, Missouri).
  2. Rachel Mancini, Louisiana Public Library National Register Nomination, 1995. (On file with the State Historic Preservation Office, Jefferson City, Missouri).
  3. History of Pike County, Missouri. (Des Moines: Mills and Company, 1883), p.423.
  4. "Powhatan Baird," Louisiana Press Journal, April 6, 1916.
  5. Schwadron, p. 307.
  6. Carol Brown Corey, "Luce-Dyer House National Register Nomination," 1982, Statement of Significance. (On file with the State Historic Preservation Office, Jefferson City, Missouri).
  7. Ibid.
  8. Sanborn Maps for Louisiana, 1896 and 1902.
  9. History of Pike County, Missouri, p. 658.
  10. Sanborn Maps for Louisiana, MO, 1885-1950.
  11. R. E. Hackman & Co.'s Louisiana and Pike County, Missouri Directory. Quincy, IL: R.E. Hackman & Co., 1907.
  12. Personal Interview with Mary G. Williams, July 28, 2004.
  13. Mancini, p. 8.7.

References

Corey, Carol Brown. "Luce-Dyer House National Register Nomination," 1982. (On file with the State Historic Preservation Office, Jefferson City, Missouri).

Hawley, D. E. Hawley's Louisiana City Directory for 1875-76. Jacksonville, IL: Hawley, Martin & Seaton, 1876.

History of Pike County, Missouri. Des Moines: Mills and Company, 1883.

Louisiana City Directory. Artkraft Directory Publishers, Inc., 1937.

Mancini, Rachel. Louisiana Public Library National Register Nomination, 1995. (On file with the State Historic Preservation Office, Jefferson City, Missouri).

Personal Interview with Mary G. Williams, July 28, 2004.

"Powhatan Baird," Louisiana Press Journal, April 6, 1916.

Prather, Charles E. Prattler's City Directory of Louisiana, MO 1903-1904. Ottumwa, IA: C.E. Prather, 1904.

R. E. Hackman & Co.'s Louisiana and Pike County, Missouri Directory. Quincy, IL: R.E. Hackman &Co., 1907.

Sanborn Map Company. Maps of Louisiana, Missouri: 1885, 1890, 1896, 1902, 1909, 1917, 1931. On file at Ellis Library, University of Missouri Columbia.

Schwadron, Karen, (ed.) Pike County, Missouri: People, Places and Pikers, Louisiana, MO: Pike County Historical Society, 1981.

Shober, Chas. & Co. Bird's Eye View of the City of Louisiana. Chicago: Chicago Lithograph Co., 1876. (Reprinted by the Pike County Historical Society).

† Becky L. Snider, Ph.D., Becky L. Snider Consulting, LLC, North Third Street Historic District, Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri, nomination document, 2005, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

North Third Street Historic District Map

Street Names
3rd Street North • 4th Street North • Jackson Street • Kentucky Street • Main Street North • Noyes Street • Route 79 • Tennessee Street • Virginia Street

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