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Jewell-Lightburne Historic District


The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. Portions of the content on this web page were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [] Adaptation copyright © 2007, The Gombach Group.

The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District is located within the city limits of Liberty, Clay County, Missouri. The district is roughly bounded by E. Franklin and E. Mill on the south; N. Jewell and Evans streets on the east; Gordon on the north; and N. Missouri and N. Water streets on the west. There are 236 contributing buildings and 47 non-contributing buildings contained within its boundaries. The district is overwhelming residential in nature, with the vast majority of the resources being residential buildings. Of the 236 contributing buildings, there are two that originally served as churches, four multi-family residential (apartments or duplexes), one dormitory, two fraternity houses, one commercial building, 34 garages/outbuildings, and 192 single family residences. Of the 47 non-contributing buildings, 21 are garages, three are apartments, and one is a commercial building. One building within the boundaries of the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District has been previously listed in the National Register of Historic Places -the Frank Hughes Memorial Library at 210 E. Franklin Street. The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District is a good example of the Residential District property type, as defined in the amendment to the Multiple Property Submission, "Historic Resources of Liberty, Clay County, Missouri" (hereafter, "Liberty MPS"). The district contains a variety of housing styles, types, and sizes. Included are pre-Civil War Greek Revival Residences, several Queen Anne style buildings, Prairie style buildings, simple National Folk forms, and early twentieth century vernacular styles. Although there are many good examples of buildings from all periods of Liberty's history in the district, the Jewell-Lightburne district contains some of the city's best examples from the late nineteenth century. The houses are generally sited on small lots close to the Courthouse Square and continuing north, with those nearer the William Jewell campus having generally larger lots. Even though the houses represent a wide span of construction dates, the physical features of the district help unify the setting. All of the streets are the typical rectangular grid laid over the rolling topography. There are alleys behind many houses, and the tree-lined streets and historic lamp posts all contribute to the historic sense of time and place within the district. The district as a whole retains integrity of location, setting, feeling, association, materials, and design, and it fulfills the registration requirements for the Residential District property type.

The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District contains 236 buildings which retain a sufficient degree of integrity to be contributing to the Residential District property type. Buildings within the district are associated with three of the contexts presented in the amendment to the Liberty MPS: Establishing a City: Liberty from 1871-1860. Stability vs. Growth: Residential Growth and the Real Estate "Boom." 1867-1896, and The "Bon ton" Suburban Community: Liberty from 1896-1946. Contained within the boundaries of the proposed National Register district are two locally designated historic districts: the Jewell Historic District, which is located east of N. Lightburne, and the Lightburne Historic District, which is located north of Mississippi along S. Water Street. These two local districts contain houses which are well maintained and retain a very high degree of integrity overall. The locally designated Jewell Historic District area contains a number of large two story buildings, many of which are used for boarding students at William Jewell College. The houses along N. Water street are large as well, with the focal point of this neighborhood being the impressive Greek Revival mansion, Lightburne Hall.

Also included in the proposed National Register district is the area located between these two locally designated district, from N. Leonard east to N. Lightburne. This area has a nice collection of working class houses, including some excellent examples of Queen Anne cottages. Integrity is more variable in this area, but the majority of houses still retain enough integrity to be contributing elements to a historic district.

The streets are a grid system laid out upon the hilly topography, which generally rises towards the William Jewell Campus and towards the north. E. Kansas is one way to the east, and E. Franklin is one way to the west; a few other streets in the area are one way as well. N. Lightburne is a major artery leading north out of town, and tends to divide the district psychologically. Many of the streets have sidewalks on both sides, and historic light fixtures are retained through a good portion of the district. Particularly in the eastern portion of the district, the streets are lined with mature deciduous shade trees, which help to unify the visual character of the district. Some of the residences with raised yards have historic limestone retaining walls.

Lot size varies through out the district. E. Franklin has large lots on the north side of the street, for example, but small lots on the south. In general, the lots are large near to William Jewell, and somewhat large along N. Water. There are moderate size lots on N. Missouri and N. Leonard north of McCarty. Generally, the setback for the houses will be the same for one side of a block, so that houses are aligned with their neighbors. The hilly topography and street trees often prevent a clear view of adjoining buildings when standing on a sidewalk. A sight line from the middle of the street at one of the prominent hills, however, affords a clear view across the historic portions of Liberty and the Courthouse Square.

There are a variety of materials used on the residences-from stucco to brick to stone, wood clapboard to asbestos siding. The siding changes do not detract from the contributing status of the buildings, however, as nearly all buildings retain a high degree of original features and floor plans. The styles and forms vary greatly as well, from the impressive Greek Revival mansion at 301 N. Water to the Prairie style houses at 433 Miller and 202 N. Water. The district is most noted for the greatest number of Victorian era houses in Liberty, including the intact collection of Queen Anne cottages on N. Leonard Street.

A full listing of the contributing buildings in the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District follows, giving the address, building type, estimated date of construction, and contributing status. A brief description of each contributing building follows the listing, which includes the style or building form, and the contributing status of any outbuildings.

200 Doniphan, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has clapboard siding and a limestone foundation on the historic portion. The house has intersecting gable roofs. The entry door has a small gabled awning supported by carved wood brackets. The attic level of the front facing gable has three arched windows. The east wing has a tripartite bay end.

214 Doniphan, house. (1919) Non-contributing. This two story foursquare house has Prairie influence in the horizontal lines formed by the widely overhanging hip roofs of the house and the full length front porch. However, the first story has been recently stuccoed and the second story has paneled cladding with half timbers. The porch has square brick corner columns, and interior wood columns on brick piers. There is a hip dormer on the south elevation. A non-contributing secondary residence at the rear is two story with plywood paneling and false half-timbering.

220 Doniphan, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This two story Queen Anne residence with vinyl siding has cross gables set on a hip roof. The gable end returns are flared, and all eaves are boxed and widely overhanging. The wrap around front porch has square columns and arched spandrels. Windows on the front gable bay are embellished with hip roofs and turned baluster balconies; the attic vent has a denticulated entablature. There is a projecting bay on the west elevation. A non-contributing two-car garage with caved-in flat roof is to the rear.

306 Doniphan, house, (c. I 895) Contributing. This one story cottage is an excellent intact example of the Queen Anne style. It has a hip roof with widely projecting cross gables; all eaves are boxed, overhanging, and form pediments on the gable ends. The south gable has angled corner walls with jig sawn spandrels. A porch flanks both sides of this projecting front gable bay, and features turned porch spindles and frieze. There is a contributing two car garage with gable roof and vinyl siding to the rear.

316 Doniphan, house, (c. 1909) Contributing. This two-and-a-half story Craftsman influenced residence has a cross gable roof, and cladding which varies on the two stories: brick is on the first and weatherboard on the second. The steeply pitched gable roofs have wide eaves with exposed rafters. The offset porch has a front gable roof with triangular knee brackets. The porch columns are massive square limestone. A shed roof dormer is on the front slope.

204 East Franklin, apartments, (c. 1912) Contributing. This three story brick apartment building has a flat roof and limestone foundation. A two story front porch has brick columns, with simple wood rails. A decorative brick belt course extends across the walls at the window lintel level on all three stories. Multi-pane sidelights flank the front door. There is tile coping on the parapet roof line.

206 E. Franklin, house, (c. 1919) Contributing. This one story Craftsman bungalow has a front gable roof with wide overhanging eaves supported by triangular knee brackets. The full length hip roof porch has simple square wood columns and balustrade. There are shed roof dormers on the east and west. Windows have entablature surround, except for the attic windows which have a projecting surround with shallow hip roof. There is a contributing one car gable roof garage with clapboard siding to the rear.

Hughes, Frank, Memorial Library; 210 East Franklin. (1940) Previously listed-not counted. Individually listed in the National Register of Historic Places on December 28,1992, this one brick Classical Revival style building has a gable roof with wide elaborate cornice line. The rear portion has a combination hip and flat roof. Steps lead form the sidewalk up to the main entrance on the south, and to a basement entrance on the east. A prominent feature on the front is the full-height, central bay portico, with two engaged square pilasters and four square paneled columns. The front portion has a boxed cornice with little overhang. A detailed entablature on the south elevation has characteristic Doric frieze ornament, consisting of triglyphs alternated with plain metopes.

300 East Franklin, house, (c. 1924) Contributing. This two story clapboard foursquare has a truncated hip roof with widely overhanging eaves. The full length front porch has simple square wood columns, with wood rails on both the ground level and the second story veranda. A classically detailed porch is at the rear northwest corner. There is a contributing one car garage with steeply pitched gable roof, chimney, and narrow clapboards to the rear.

306 East Franklin, house, (c. 1906) Non-contributing. A foursquare with recently applied wide synthetic siding and false brick on the front facade.

Estes-Arthur House; 316 East Franklin, (c. 1859) Contributing. This two story brick I-house has a hip roof with centered steeply pitched wall gable. The overhanging eaves have a wide cornice band and curved brackets, typical of the Italianate style. The 7/8 length front porch has a steep mansard roof with square Italianate columns. The first story entry door has sidelights and transom. There is a two story rear addition, and a non-contributing one car garage with side door and aluminum siding.

405 East Franklin, house, (c. 1908) Contributing. This bungalow features a full length front porch with flat roof. Stone pillars support the porch, which is surrounded by stone rails. A large stone fireplace is prominent on the right.

409 East Franklin, house, (c. 1908) Contributing. This single-story pyramidal National Folk residence has an simple front porch with square columns and rails. A single stack brick chimney is located at the rear.

416 East Franklin, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This Queen Anne residence features many free classic details, including a denticulated cornice, carved modillions under the eaves, ornamental arched windows, and carved wooden decoration in the gable ends. A large wrap-around porch is supported by square columns and with complementary square rails. Wall treatments include clapboard and shingles.

417 East Franklin, house. Contributing. This gable-front-&-wing house features a two story bay window on the front gable. Square porch columns rest on stone. The wall treatment is clapboard. There is a contributing one car garage with gable roof and clapboard siding to the rear.

425 East Franklin, house. Contributing. This foursquare residence features a full-length front porch with slender Doric columns that support a shed roof. Hip-roof dormers are located on all four sides of the pyramidal roof.

Liberty Female College dormitory, 430 East Franklin, (c. 1855) Contributing. This Greek Revival style structure features an accentuated front door set within a tabernacle frame with multi-paned glass transom and sidelights. The full-length front porch is supported with slender columns. A screened porch toward the left rear joins the original house with an early addition. There is a contributing outbuilding with clapboard siding and gable roof to the rear.

431 East Franklin, house. Contributing. This Gable-front residence features a full-length front porch with a small gable over the porch entrance on the left front. Slender Doric columns support the porch. Gable dormers are located on either side.

438 East Franklin, house, (c. 1855) Non-contributing. A three story much altered stucco building with hip roof; original entryway with sidelights, but other windows on the main facade are not original.

439 East Franklin, house, (c. 1907) Contributing. This Foursquare structure features a pyramidal roof with bellcast hip-roof dormers at the front and side elevations. A wrap around full-length front porch has Doric columns and turned balusters. The large, square windows feature plain moldings and are tucked beneath the wide eaves. There is a non-contributing small gable roof garage with clapboard siding.

Sandusky, John, House; 449 East Franklin, (c. 1885) Contributing. This Gable-front-&-wing features double and single arch windows with decorative wood moldings. The full-length front porch wraps from the front gable and across the wing, supported by plain round columns with no rails. A bay window with similar details is located on the right elevation. The original siding has been covered with asbestos shingles. There is a non-contributing two story garage; concrete walls are on the first floor and clapboard on the second.

Routt-Plumb House; 450 East Franklin, (c. 1860) Contributing. This "Princess Anne" variant of the Queen Anne style features an irregular roofline and asymmetrical floor plan with a wrap-around front porch. Classical porch columns support a shed roof and second floor balcony. The wall treatment has been covered with asbestos siding.

454 East Franklin, house. (1924) Contributing. This Gable-front residence has a simple facade which is distinguished only by a tabernacle enclosure for the entry way with bracketed gabled hood. A two-story porch, located on the left elevation, features some Craftsman detailing in the porch supports and rails. Wall treatments include brick on the first story and stucco on the second.

457 East Franklin, contributing, (c. 1930) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Dutch Colonial Revival house has asbestos siding, a side gambrel roof, and a shed roof dormer on the front facade with four small windows. The three quarter length mansard roof porch has square tapering wood columns set on brick piers. The front door has multi-pane glass lights. There is a non-contributing two car garage with gable roof and board & batten siding.

Rothwell, John, House; 459 East Franklin, (c. 1885) Contributing. This Queen Anne cottage features an extremely varied roofline and wrap-around front porch. The porch has turned posts and open spindlework in the frieze. Decorated lintels and leaded glass panels accentuate the windows. A conical bay window is located on the right elevation. The wall treatment is stucco. There is a non-contributing garage with plywood siding and hip roof.

114 North Jewell, house. Non-contributing. A one story Minimal Traditional house with wood siding.

116 North Jewell, house. (1924) Contributing. This modest Bungalow features a front porch supported by wooden columns with brick supports that has been screened. Wall treatment is wood shiplap siding.

124 North Jewell, house. (1923) Contributing. This Bungalow features a hip roof that extends over the full-width front porch. A narrow dormer with shed roof and exposed rafters is located at the front. A secondary entrance is located on the right facade.

126 North Jewell, house, (c. 1915) Contributing. This Bungalow has stucco walls with brick headers that form an arch over the front door, lintels and sills of brick surround the windows. The chimney, located on the right elevation, is decorated with brick.

226 North Jewell, house. (1915) Contributing. This brick Foursquare features an in-set, open porch and entryway at the main elevation. Windows on the first story have stone sills and lintels, while the second story features only stone sills. The roof has wide eaves and a gabled dormer with returns at the front elevation.

320 North Jewell, house. Non-contributing. Both the house and the two-story garage (non-contributing) are of recent construction.

7 South Jewell, house, (c. 1915) Contributing. This large Foursquare structure features a hipped roof, full-length front porch. A bellcast dormer is located in the front of the hip roof. The porch is supported by square columns, resting on brick supports, with a wood rail.

14 South Jewell, house. (1926) Contributing. This side gable Bungalow features a sloping shed roof which extends over the porch. The porch is supported by brick piers and has a brick balustrade. A single gabled dormer with broad eaves is located at the front.

Kappa Alpha Fraternity House, 17 South Jewell. (c. 1907) Contributing. This Neoclassical brick residence has a colonnaded front porch which occupies the full width and height of the facade. The flat roof of the porch extends from the principal side gabled roof. Five gabled dormers are located at the front. Simple square columns support the porch roof. Four symmetrical french doors are located on the first floor.

18 South Jewell, house. (1926) Contributing. This Craftsman bungalow residence features a shed roof which covers the front porch. The porch is supported by solid brick piers. Craftsman style brackets are located in the front gable.

26 South Jewell, house, (c. 1920) Contributing. This Foursquare residence features bellcast gable roofs with pronounced returns on the main roof, the dormer on the front facade, and the extended, full-length front porch. The porch is supported by brick piers and has been enclosed with aluminum frames. The wall treatments are varied with brick veneer on the first story and clapboard covered by asbestos shingle above.

27 South Jewell, house, (c. 1905) Contributing. This Foursquare features a full length front porch which has an unusual truncated hip roof supported by Doric columns which rest on a limestone porch wall. A single story dormer with hip roof is located at the front. Wall treatment is clapboard. There is a one-car gable roof non-contributing two car garage with vertical plywood siding and gable roof.

30 South Jewell, house. (1923) Contributing. This Bungalow features a recessed entryway on the left front. The gable roof has wide eaves which are supported by false brackets. A single gabled dormer with exposed rafters is located on the left side.

34 South Jewell, house. (1923) Contributing. This Bungalow has a broad gabled roof which is supported under the eaves by brackets. The entryway is accented by a gabled hood which is supported by wrought iron pillars. A tripartite bay is located on the right side.

40 South Jewell, house, (c. 1920) Contributing. This Bungalow has a low, broad gabled roof lined with rafters and false brackets. Two porches have been enclosed on both sides. The principal entrance is located on the left porch against the left wall. A single stack brick chimney is located on the front elevation.

400 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Gable Ell is a simple folk house with two single stack paneled brick chimneys and a single story tripartite bay on the principal facade and a second bay on the right. The porch has a flat roof with simple square wood supports. Asbestos siding covers the original wall treatment.

403 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This cross-gabled Bungalow has a low pitched, gabled roof with wide, overhanging eaves. The gabled, full-width front porch is supported by square piers which rest on a limestone wall. Some of the windows feature transoms.

409 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Foursquare features a pyramidal roof. The full length front porch has a hipped roof and is supported by square columns with a square rail. On the right side, a wood staircase ascends to an apartment on the second floor.

410 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This simple Gable-front-&-wing residence has a shed roof porch with replacement posts. The exterior has been covered in asbestos shingles. There is a contributing one car garage with clapboard siding and gable roof to the rear.

416 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Gable-front-&-wing home features some Queen Anne detailing in its paneled brick chimney and Eastlake detailing in the porch frieze and turned porch posts. The porch has a hip roof. There is a non-contributing gable roof one-car garage with vinyl siding to the north.

417 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Gable-front residence features a low hip roof and a wrap-around porch supported by classically shaped columns. The rectangular, double-sash windows are narrow with entablature surrounds.

424 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Gable-front-&-wing building has a small, hip-roof front porch. The porch is supported by round columns with wood rails. The doors and windows have entablature surrounds. Non-historic shutters have been added to the windows.

462 East Kansas, house. (1924) Contributing. This Colonial Revival style brick residence features a symmetrical facade, with paired windows on the first story. The door surround is arched with some classical details.

Liberty Christian Church, 427 East Kansas. (1907) Contributing. This impressive two story brick Gothic Revival style church has a basic rectangular plan in the historic portion with multiple intersecting, steeply pitched gable roofs. A three story tower is set at an angle at the northwest corner, and features a steeply pitched pedimented entry door with Gothic arched transom above and a rough-cut stone lintel. The steeply pitched pyramidal tower roof is accentuated with finials, as are the battlemented roof corners. Intersecting gable roofs flanking the tower feature two story Gothic arched stained glass windows. Stone detailing contrasts with the brick, such as in the window lintels, sills, and belt courses. A two story modern addition to the rear has a flat roof and is connected to the south of the church by a two story glass breezeway.

430 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Gable-front residence features a flat-roof front porch which has been screened. A tripartite bay window is located on the right side, while the front facade features a prominent, rectangular bay on the second story.

436 East Kansas, house. (1911) Contributing. This Foursquare features a pyramidal roof and a full-length front porch with hip roof. Tapered, round columns support the porch, with square wood rails. A tripartite bay is located on the right near the front. The original wall treatment has been covered with asbestos siding. There is a non-contributing two car garage of concrete block with gable roof to the rear.

444 East Kansas, house. Non-contributing. A one story side gable ranch house with asbestos siding. There is a contributing garage to the rear with gable roof and board & batten siding.

Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity House, 449 East Kansas. (1906) Contributing. This two story brick Neoclassical residence burned in August 1996 and was severely damaged. Its future is unknown. It has a full height pedimented portico with massive tapered columns with Ionic capitals. The moderately pitched gable roof has end returns and a wide cornice band beneath. There are two gable roof dormers with boxed eaves. The windows have stone sills and lintels, and are 8/1. The accentuated doorway has an arched fanlight above. Brick quoins decorate the building's corners.

455 East Kansas, house. (1919) Contributing. This Colonial Revival residence features entablature surrounds on the first floor, a gabled entry way supported by classical posts, and battered porch columns. The two-story porch is located on the left elevation and features wooden rails and brick piers supporting the columns.

456 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This small Gable-front-&-wing home features a porch with a shed roof, supported by brick columns. The front gable has deep returns and is accented at the corners by coupled carved brackets.

462 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Foursquare residence features a full length front porch on the first and second floors. On the first story, the porch is supported by stone columns, while the second story has square wood columns. The windows and doors are symmetrical across the front facade. The wall treatment has been covered with asbestos shingles.

463 East Kansas, house. (1924) Contributing. This Pyramidal Foursquare residence has a wide front porch with shallow hip roof, supported by stone columns. The windows are double hung with plain moldings.

471 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Queen Anne structure has many typical features of the style, including the irregular plan and mass. The high roof is accented with wrought iron roof cresting. The wrap-around porch features Eastlake details in its turned porch posts, balusters, and spindlework.

481 East Kansas, house. Contributing. This Bungalow features a protruding porch with a gable over the entrance and hip roof across the front facade. Craftsman style details include the square, tapered columns and wood rails. A shed roof dormer with exposed rafters is located on the left. The wall treatment is stucco.

483 East Kansas, house. (1930) Contributing. This one story stucco Colonial Revival home (Cape Cod variant) has a steeply pitched side gable roof with an exterior brick chimney. The centered entry door has a pedimented awning porch roof with decorative brackets beneath. The windows are 6/1.

200 Laura Street, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two story gable-front residence has a combination of clapboard and composite material siding on the first two stories, and decorative wood shingles in the attic level gable end. There is a she roof front porch with exposed rafter tails, and simple square wood columns. Second story windows have an upper sash with clear central pane surrounded by small colored glass lights. A secondary entrance on the west is on the second story, and is reached by wood stairs. There is a one story rear addition.

207 Laura Street, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two story gable-front-&-wing has end returns and a wide unadorned cornice band beneath its projecting eaves. It has asbestos siding and an enclosed flat roof porch set within the ell. The tall narrow windows have simple surrounds, and are sometimes paired.

208 Laura Street, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story gable-front-&-wing has Victorian era detailing, which includes a bay window on the gable end, gable end returns, paired decorative brackets under the eaves, and a shed roof porch set within the ell with turned spindles. It has asbestos shingles and a brick foundation.

211 Laura Street, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This Queen Anne cottage is one story with asbestos siding. It has intersecting gable roofs set on a hip roof. The wrap around mansard roof porch has non-historic wrought iron support. There is a project tripartite bay on the east end. Windows are tall and narrow with entablature surrounds. There is a non-contributing one car garage with shiplap siding to the rear.

212 Laura Street, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne is one story with asbestos siding. It has intersecting gable roofs set on a truncated hip roof. The wrap around hip roof porch has been enclosed. There are tripartite bays with hip roofs on both gable ends. Windows are tall and narrow.

216 Laura Street, house. Non-contributing. Garage. Non-contributing. A much altered two story I-house with asbestos siding and enclosed front porch. The garage has a gambrel roof and clapboard siding.

Romona Apartments; 114-116 N. Leonard. (1910) Contributing. This two story brick apartment building has a flat roof with corbeled brick parapet with tile coping. The three quarter length front porch has square vari-colored brick columns and a veranda above on the second story with brick balustrade. The lintel level of the windows have an encircling belt course. The windows are slightly recessed and have stone sills. The are corner quoins, and the main entry doors are multi-pane.

117 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1903) Contributing. This one story gable-front-&-wing house has clapboards with corner board. The gable roofs have overhanging eaves, end returns, and a plain cornice band beneath. There is a hip roof porch with round classically inspired columns. The windows and doors have entablature surrounds.

119 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1924) Contributing. This one story clapboard bungalow has a gable front roof with overhanging eaves and simple triangular knee braces on the gable end. The offset gable front porch has tapered square wood columns and wood rails. There is a projecting oriel bay on the north elevation.

120 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1913) Contributing. This one story bungalow has asbestos siding and a steeply pitched hip roof with wide overhanging eaves. The porch is recessed beneath the overhanging eaves of the roof, and is supported by round Doric columns. There is a bellcast hip roof dormer on the front. A contributing garage is to the rear.

Buchard, Ella, house; 125 N. Leonard. (1924) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a hip roof with front gablet. The vinyl sided house has wide overhanging eaves with exposed rafters. There is a full length front porch with square wood posts.

128 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one story clapboard gable-front-&-wing has many Victorian era elements, included gable end returns with paired scrolled brackets at the corner; a tripartite bay window on the south elevation; a flat roof porch within the ell with turned porch posts and jig sawn spandrels. The tall narrow windows have decorative lintels and jambs, with brackets supporting the entablature. There is a contributing garage with gable roof and board & batten siding to the rear.

Leonard Apartments; 138 N. Leonard. (1939) Contributing. This two story apartment building has a limestone foundation, brick veneer cladding on the first and second story, and stucco on the gable end of the jerkinhead gable roof. The stucco ends, combined with the gable portico supported by wood brackets, are reflective of the Tudor Revival style. The windows flanking the front entry are paired, and are 6/1. There is a contributing three car shed roof garage with board & batten siding to the rear.

218 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1912) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a hip roof with wide overhanging eaves and a hip roof front dormer. The shed roof three quarter length porch has square wood columns and wood rails with trellises. The clapboard house has pre-cast rusticated concrete block foundation. There are square oriel bay windows on the south elevation. It has a contributing one car garage with additional door, hip roof, and clapboard siding.

219 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1955) Non-contributing. A one story brick ranch house with gable roof.

225 N. Leonard, house. (1924) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a front gable roof with overhanging eaves, and a lower gable front porch supported by wide tapered square columns on brick piers. A bay window is on the south elevation.

230 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one story gable-front-&-wing has a hip roof porch set within the ell that has turned porch columns. This house has weatherboard siding and a brick foundation. There is a contributing garage to the rear with shiplap siding and a gable roof.

Porter, Charles, house; 233 N. Leonard. (1925) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a hipped gable roof with wide overhanging eaves. It has stucco siding and concrete block foundation. The full width front porch is recessed beneath the overhanging attic level, and is supported by truncated wood columns on brick piers. There is a rear hip roof dormer. There is a contributing garage to the rear with clapboard siding, hip roof and exposed rafters.

402 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has intersecting cross gable roofs set on a truncated hip roof. The wrap around front porch has turned porch spindle posts and frieze. There is a front bay window with hip roof, and an enclosed porch with shed roof on the southwest corner.

403 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two story gable-front-&-wing house has Victorian era detailing, including the wide cornice band with bracketed eaves at the gable end returns. The hip roof front porch has Doric columns and wood rails.

408 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has a multiple compound roof, with cross gables set on multiple hip roofs. The wide overhanging boxed eaves have paired scrolled brackets at the corners. A small shed roof porch set within one ell has turned spindle posts and a jig sawn frieze. There are also decorative vergeboards. The house has asbestos siding and a brick foundation. There is a front bay windows with hip roof.

409 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Queen Anne residence has shiplap siding and a brick foundation. The irregular multiple roofs include intersecting gables set on cross truncated hip roofs. The eaves are boxed and overhanging. The wrap around front porch has turned posts and a gabled pediment over the entry with decoration. The front gable second story have triple windows with bracketed entablature. Wood quoins also embellish this Victorian building.

416 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one story weatherboard gable-front-&-wing has a hip roof bay on the front gable wing. A small hip roof porch is set within the ell, and has simple square columns. Wood quoins decorate the corners, giving further indication of its Victorian era origins.

419 N. Leonard, house. (1951) Non-contributing. A one story Cape Cod subtype of the Colonial Revival style with vinyl siding.

422 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has the typical irregular roof line, with cross gables set on a hip roof and wide overhanging eaves. Large wood quoins dominate the corners of the shiplap sided house. The gable ends retain decorative wood shingles as well. The small shed roof porch set within the ell has Craftsman era supports-square wood columns set on brick piers.

423 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1990) Non-contributing. A one and a half story raised ranch with stucco and wood siding.

430 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story house has Queen Anne rooflines, with a large wrap around Craftsman era porch. The porch has large square truncated columns set on limestone piers, with a limestone balustrade. The cross gable roofs of the house are steeply pitched, and have boxed overhanging eaves and gable end returns. There is aluminum siding and a limestone foundation.

431 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This two story clapboard Queen Anne house has intersecting gable roofs set on a truncated hip. The roofs have boxed, overhanging eaves with paired brackets on the corner. A wrap around front porch has square columns and wood rails on both the ground level and the second story veranda. There is a one story bay window on the south, and a two story bay on the front gable. A contributing garage to the rear has clapboard siding and a gable roof.

438 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has vinyl siding and a brick foundation. The bellcast truncated hip roof has gable roof dormers and a pyramidal hip bay on the south. The lower front gable porch is non-original, and has square brick columns. The tall, narrow windows have simple wood surrounds.

Hale, Francis, house; 441 N. Leonard. (1928) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Tudor Revival house has multiple gable roofs (steeply pitched) with an asymmetrical facade. The entry is set within the end of the long sloping front gable, and has an arched brick entry. There are shed and gable roof dormers, and the gable end on the side have stucco with decorative half timbers. The remaining wall cladding is brick. A screened-in porch is at the southwest elevation. A molded brick chimney has chimney pots.

444 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story clapboard Queen Anne house has a complex roof line, with gable hip and dormers. The are paired scrolled wood brackets on a wide cornice band. A shed roof porch is supported by brick columns. A multi-pane French door opens to the porch. A non-contributing garage is to the rear.

447 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1920) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Tudor Revival house has steeply pitched, multiple gables and a combination of brick veneer and stucco with decorative half timbers. The cross gables roofs are multiple on both bays, with lowered extended gable ends. The front gable bay has a screened-in porch flanked by brick buttresses. Windows are often in multiple groupings. A contributing garage to the rear has stucco siding has a gable roof.

456 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1921) Contributing. This one story Craftsman bungalow has a side gable roof with projecting gable front porch supported by truncated columns on stone piers. The narrow clapboard house sits on a high limestone foundation. The wide overhanging eaves have exposed rafters.

458 N. Leonard, house. Non-contributing. A one story Cape Cod subtype of the Colonial Revival style with vinyl siding.

459 N. Leonard, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This two story weatherboard house has a steeply pitched gable roof over the main entrance. The west elevation has a screened-in porch with gablet above. A shed roof enclosure on the second story is at the south.

The house at 17 South Lightburne (c. 1860/moved 1920; originally counted as contributing) was demolished after the nomination was originally prepared. The two story frame I-house was three ranked. The centered entry door had sidelights and paired windows above on the second story. The entry porch was supported by two tapering square columns, probably constructed at the time of the building's move, c. 1920. A two story shed roof addition was on the rear.

25 South Lightburne, house, (c. 1925) Contributing. This Bungalow features an open porch supported by truncated and tapered wooden piers on brick supports. The roof is hipped, with a gable on the front elevation. There is a contributing one car garage with gable roof and clapboard siding to the rear.

110 North Lightburne. (c. 1980) Non-contributing. A two story brick apartment building.

116 North Lightburne. (1924) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story bungalow has a gable front roof with hip roof full length front porch has tapering wood columns on stone piers. There windows are typical Craftsman 3/1. It has a stone foundation and clapboard siding.

124 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1890) Non-contributing. A two story house, perhaps formerly Queen Anne with hip roofs but much altered; unpainted plywood siding and no windows on the main facade.

125 North Lightburne, duplex, (c. 1985) Non-contributing. A wood duplex with brick veneer on the front facade and a side gable roof.

128 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1924) Contributing. This one story bungalow has concrete block foundation and clapboard siding. The gable front roof has a slightly lower, extended gable front porch with paired wood posts on brick piers. The open eaves have exposed rafters and corner brackets. Large fixed sash windows have multi-pane transoms above.

133 North Lightburne, house. Contributing. This Gable-front-&-wing residence has an open porch with wooden supports and wide entablature. Carved, coupled cornice brackets and gable trusses can be found on all elevations. The original wall treatment has been covered with false siding.

139 North Lightburne, house. Contributing. This two-story Gable-front-&-wing structure has a hipped roof porch supported with wooden posts below a decorative entablature and a wood railing on the second story. A bay window is located on the first floor of the front gable. Asbestos siding covers the original wall treatment.

140 North Lightburne, house. (1937) Contributing. This one story Minimal Traditional house has intersecting gable roofs which are steeply pitched and have close rakes. The porch at the gable front end has probably been enclosed. There is a projecting gable bay at the south end.

202-204 North Lightburne, duplex, (c. 1980) Non-contributing. A one and a half story duplex of stucco and wood.

213 North Lightburne, house. (1912) Contributing. This Bungaloid features a large, full-length front porch with sloping roof, supported by stone columns. A gabled dormer with exposed rafters is located on the front facade.

216 N. Lightburne, house. (1947) Non-contributing. A one story ranch house of brick and stucco.

217 North Lightburne, house. Contributing. This I-house features a small, symmetrically placed steep gable on the front facade. The main entry is topped with a fixed glass transom below a wooden entablature. The original porch has been replaced with one similar in style, size and scale.

224 N. Lightburne, house. (1932) Contributing. This one story Tudor Revival style house has the typical brick and stucco wall cladding. There are multiple steeply pitched gables, including the gable front entry bay. There are brick quoins at the corners and around the door enframement. The south side contains an open porch with wood columns. The front steps are semi-circular brick.

225 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1910) Contributing. This Foursquare features steeply pitched gable roof with a gabled wing at the rear. A large, open porch with stone columns and flat roof extends across the front elevation. There is a non-contributing two car garage with plywood siding and gable roof.

231 North Lightburne, house. Contributing. This Gable-front-&-wing cottage has Victorian details including long, narrow windows and carved coupled cornice brackets. A flat-roof porch is supported by square columns with a square wood rails. There is a contributing garage with hip roof and narrow clapboard.

232 N. Lightburne, house. (1931) Contributing. This two story Tudor Revival style house has stucco and brick wall cladding with stone details. There are three prominent steeply pitched gables on the front set on a hip roof. The second story overhangs the first and has decorative battens. A gabled brick portico bay with arched entrance is slightly off-center.

238 N. Lightburne, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story house with brick foundation and asbestos siding has intersecting gable roofs forming a cross plan. There is a hip roof front bay with paired decorative brackets beneath the eaves. A screened-in porch is set within one ell. There are two interior brick chimneys.

239 North Lightburne, house. Contributing. This plain Gable-front-&-wing residence has a porch with sloping roof that is supported by square wood posts. A window box on the front facade is not original. A non-contributing two car concrete block garage with gable roof is at the rear.

304 N. Lightburne, house. (1940) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story brick Colonial Revival house has a steeply pitched side gable roof with three gable dormers on the front. The centered entry portico is classically detailed, with four supporting columns, two pilasters, and a veranda above with wood rails. The front entry is flanked by tripartite multi-pane windows. Two exterior brick chimneys with corbeled caps are at the south and north elevation, and are flanked by Colonial Revival style windows.

311 North Lightburne, house. (1906) Contributing. This Gable-front brick structure features a large, open porch with hipped roof that extends the full length of the front facade. The porch is supported by brick columns, has brick walls, and an arched foundation. Paired windows on the second floor are arched. There is a contributing one car garage constructed of tile blocks and having a gable roof with exposed rafters.

321 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1910) Contributing. This Dutch Colonial Revival residence has a prominent gambrel roof. A large shed-roof dormer extends across the front facade. A hooded entry has carved wooden brackets. An flat roof, open porch is located on the right is supported by square columns and has square wood rails. There is a contributing one car garage with metal gable roof and clapboard siding.

402 North Lightburne, house. (1910) Contributing. This two-and-a-half story Prairie style house has a low pitched hip roof with very wide, overhanging enclosed eaves. The horizontal design is further emphasized by the differentiation in materials between the limestone foundation and the brick walls, as well as the strong lines in the porch. The two story veranda porch has square brick columns with a brick balustrade. There is a projecting bay on the north elevation.

403 North Lightburne, house. (1912) Contributing. This Dutch Colonial Revival structure has a gambrel roof with a nearly full-length dormer on the front facade. The full-length porch features paired square columns and a decorative rail.

407 North Lightburne, house. (1912) Contributing. This Dutch Colonial Revival residence features an asymmetrical front gable. A small shed roof dormer is located on the front facade. French doors serve as a secondary entrance on the front.

408 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1913) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story clapboard bungaloid has Craftsman style features, such as the shed roof porch with brick columns and the open roof eaves of the side gable roof and front gable dormer. The windows are typical Craftsman 3/1.

420 North Lightburne, house. (1952) Non-contributing. A one story brick ranch house.

Stone-Yancey O'Dell House; 421 North Lightburne. (c. 1890) Contributing. This brick Queen Anne residence has two open porches, including a wrap-around porch on the front. The porches are decorated with carved, turned posts and a decorative rail. Cast iron roof cresting decorates the porch roof and the main, hip-roof line. The cornice has carved, coupled brackets and modillions, along with large, carved wooded brackets on a projecting bay at the right.

430 North Lightburne, house. (1927) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story clapboard residence is minimally reflective of the Tudor Revival style with its steeply pitched gables. The double-hung windows have multi-pane top sashes. The open porch has wood supports and rails. The front facing gable has a small Palladian window.

458 North Lightburne, house, (c. 1911) Contributing. This two story foursquare house has Prairie style influences in the widely overhanging eaves of the low pitched hip roof. It has a limestone foundation and narrow wall clapboards with corner boards. The offset from porch has a gable front roof with stone balustrade and non-original iron supports. There is a contributing one car garage with gable roof and clapboard siding to the rear.

20 Lincoln, house. Contributing. This simple Folk: Hall and Parlor residence features minimal detailing in the porch, with turned balusters on the railing, and some entablature surrounds. The side gable roof is interrupted on the front facade by a small gabled dormer just above the shed roof porch.

24 Lincoln, house. Contributing. This Front Gable residence has a hip roof porch which has been enclosed. Plain wood moldings around the windows and doors are the only detailing is present on this structure. The original wall treatment is hidden by asbestos shingles.

203 McCarty, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two story vinyl sided house has intersecting gables, but has a square floor plan unlike the gable-front-&-wing houses. The full length flat roof porch has paired classically influenced columns set on paneled plinths. The gable end is pedimented, and there is a hip roof oriel window on the west.

Evans, J. F., house; 207 McCarty. (1925) Contributing. This one story clapboard bungalow has a front gable roof with overhanging eaves. The gable front porch has tapering square wood columns on brick piers. Coupled attic windows have an entablature surround.

211 McCarty, house, (c. 1909) Contributing. This two story foursquare has clapboard siding, a limestone foundation, a hip roof with wide overhanging eaves above a plain cornice band. A two story projecting bay on the west also has a hip roof, and has an oriel window on the first story as well. The offset one bay front porch has tapering square wood columns on brick piers, and a brick balustrade. The second story veranda has simple wood rails. There is a hip roof dormer.

314 McCarty, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story gable-front-&-wing has Victorian era has gable end returns and paired brackets at the corners. There is a shed roof porch set within the ell, and the house has asbestos shingles. There is an addition to the southwest corner of the house. The windows are tall & narrow.

460 East Mill, house. Contributing. This two story Queen Anne house has the highly irregular roof lines typical of the style, with steeply pitched hip and gable on hip. There are decorative scrolled brackets beneath the eaves, and the tall narrow windows have bracketed pediments. Decorative vergeboards decorative the gable end. The wrap around hip roof porch has a turned spindlework frieze and porch columns.

Lard, Moses, House; 470 East Mill. (c. 1853) Contributing. This one story frame Greek Revival house is three ranked, and has a side gable roof with prominent boxed eaves. The cornice band is accentuate with a dentil band. The central front porch bay has a shallow shed roof supported by classically inspired square columns. The front entry door has a transom above and sidelights.

478 East Mill, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This two story clapboard Queen Anne house has the irregular roof typical of the style, with its steeply pitched gable and hip on hip. The wrap around hip roof porch has turned spindle supports and jig-sawn frieze. There is a one story flat roof bay, and the windows are tall and narrow with simple entablature surrounds. There is a non-contributing carport garage with aluminum siding in the gable end.

Smithey-Ritchey-Cane House; 504 East Mill. (1857) Contributing. This one story brick residence is a very modest temple-front version of the Greek Revival style, with a later shallow hip roof Victorian-era porch added. The porch has turned spindle supports and balusters, and has steps leading from both sides. The windows and door on the original portion have entablature. There is a one story clapboard addition on the east, and a non-contributing one car garage with door, side gable roof, and wood siding.

516 East Mill, house. Contributing. This one story narrow clapboard house has a cross plan formed by the moderately pitched intersecting hip roofs. The roofs have wide overhanging eaves. The windows have entablatures surrounds. There is a shed roof porch with non-historic supports set within the front ell.

526 East Mill, house, (c. 1906) Contributing. This two story stucco bungaloid has a steeply pitched gable roof with large gable dormers on the north and south with boxed eaves. The recessed front porch has stone columns. The is an oriel window on the west and a tripartite bay window on the east. A small contributing vertical clapboard garage with hip roof is at the side.

538 East Mill, house. Contributing. This two story house with limestone foundation and asbestos shingle siding has elements typical of the Italianate style, which were often found of buildings during the Queen Anne period. The steeply pitched bellcast hip roof is more indicative of the latter style. The wide eaves have paired decorative bracket beneath. The tall narrow windows are sometimes paired, and have bracketed entablatures. The entry door has a transom above. The full length front porch with square wood supports is probably c. 1920. There is a contributing two story barn with asbestos roof shingle siding, and a gable roof with extended shed roof addition.

402 Miller, house. (1907) Contributing. This one story bungalow with clapboard and shingle siding has a wrap around front porch recessed beneath. The porch supports are paired tapering wood columns set on brick piers. There are hip roof dormers with leaded glass windows.

411 Miller, house. (1925) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story bungaloid has clapboard siding and a side gable roof which extends over the full length porch. The porch has square brick columns and simple wood rails. There is a large gable front dormer with overhanging eaves. Wood stairs lead to a second story entry on a side elevation.

412 Miller, house. Contributing. This one story clapboard bungaloid has a low pitched hip roof with overhanging eaves. The entry door is one bay wide and recessed beneath the porch roof. The house sits on a high limestone foundation. The non-historic front porch is a wood deck.

414 Miller, apartments. Non-contributing. Two story brick apartments with gable roof.

416 Miller, apartments. Non-contributing. Two story brick apartments with gable roof.

417 Miller, house. (1909) Contributing. This two story foursquare has a hip roof, limestone foundation, and asbestos shingle siding. There are hip dormers on the north and south elevation, and shed roof dormers on the east and west. The full length ship roof porch has slender classically inspired columns.

425 Miller, house. (1907) Contributing. This two story Gable-front house has a limestone foundation, clapboard siding, and three gable dormers on both the east and west elevations. The full length flat roof front porch has classically inspired columns on stone plinths.

433 Miller, house. (1906) Contributing. This two story stucco and brick residence is one of the purest examples of the Prairie style in Liberty. The low pitched hip roofs over the various portions of the house have widely overhanging eaves. Horizontal lines are further emphasized with wood courses dividing the stucco surface. Windows are both casement and double-hung. There are oversize brackets and columns.

439 Miller, house. (1912) Contributing. This two story brick house is a variant of the foursquare. It has a full length one story porch with flat roof supported by square brick columns. A second story tripartite bay window is set beneath a gable front dormer. Windows have arched lintels.

440 Miller, house. (1907) Contributing. This one story bungaloid has a moderate pitched hip roof with recessed wrap around front porch. The porch has classically inspired columns, a high stone foundation, and one end has been enclosed. There are hip roof dormers.

449 Miller, house, (c. 1910) Contributing. This two story clapboard foursquare has a bellcast hip roof with overhanging eaves. The full length front porch has screened-in, and has classically inspired columns. There is a projecting bay on the west, and a shed roof dormer on the north. There is a non-contributing concrete block garage with gable roof.

455 Miller, house. (1907) Contributing. This two story foursquare has narrow clapboard siding, a bellcast hip roof with wide eaves, and a full-length one story porch with square classically inspired columns. There is a bellcast gable dormer on the front, and a projecting bay on the east. A contributing shiplap one car garage is to the rear.

202 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1906) Contributing. This two story brick foursquare has a steeply pitched hip roof with prominent gable dormer on the front. The one story wrap around porch has square brick columns and a brick balustrade. Other features include wood modillions, brick quoins, and stone sills and lintels.

207 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two-and-a-half story clapboard foursquare has a front gable roof with cross gable dormers and gable end returns with overhanging eaves. The full length front porch has a flat roof with classically inspired columns. There is a projecting bay on both the east and west elevations.

210 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1870) Contributing. This one story clapboard double pen residence has two entries on the main facade. The front gable portico has simple square wood posts. The house was constructed as servants' quarters for the associated residence to the eat, 214 East Mississippi.

Goldman, Manheim, house; 214 East Mississippi, (c. 1870) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Gothic Revival house has a side gable roof punctuated by three gable wall dormers; all gable roofs are very steeply pitched and feature decorative finials. The paired windows on the historic portion of the house are Gothic arched. The three quarter length porch has a flat roof with simple wood columns. There is a two story rear addition.

Costello House; 303 East Mississippi, house. (1854/c. 1899) Contributing. This gable-front-&-wing (originally probably a hall and parlor) one story residence has asbestos shingles. A small shed roof porch is on the east elevation and has tapering wood columns. A metal awning covers the front entry stoop, which has a gable dormer above.

306 East Mississippi, house, (unknown) Contributing. A one story residence with stucco walls and intersecting low-pitched hip roofs. There is a porch with wood posts and balustrade set within the ell formed by the one bay attached garage at the south.

309 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1897) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story bungaloid has a gable front roof with wide eaves supported by triangular knee braces. The gable front porch roof is supported by square tapering columns on brick piers. The tall narrow windows has wood surrounds. There is an exterior brick chimney and shed roof dormer on the east elevation.

313 East Mississippi, house. (1947) Non-contributing. A one story gable front house with lower extending gable front bay.

402 East Mississippi, house. (1913) Contributing. This two story Craftsman house has cross gable roofs with widely overhanging eaves and gable end returns. The first story is clad with brick veneer, the second in narrow wood clapboard, and the attic gable ends in wood shingles. The gable front porch has square brick columns. There is a shed roof side entrance.

411 East Mississippi, house. (1927) Contributing. This one story stucco bungalow has decorative half-timbering in the gable end of the front porch, as well as at the lintel level course. The front porch has large square stucco columns. Windows are the typical 3/1 Craftsman style.

417 East Mississippi, house. (1927) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Dutch Colonial Revival has a side gambrel roof with boxed eaves and stucco walls. A pedimented portico has end returns and arched frieze band. Windows are 6/1 or 3/1.

418 East Mississippi, house. (1921) Contributing. This one story stucco Craftsman bungalow has a side gable roof with front slope extending over the full length front porch. The porch has grouped slender wood columns on limestone piers and a limestone balustrade. A large shed roof dormer is on the front with exposed rafters.

424 East Mississippi, house. (1909) Contributing. This two story foursquare house has a gable front roof with boxed overhanging eaves and wood shingles in the gable end. The clapboard siding is wide on the first story and narrow on the second. The full length one story porch has classically inspired wood columns. There is a bay window on the west elevation.

427 East Mississippi, house. (1908) Contributing. This simple two story foursquare has a truncated hip roof, clapboard siding with end boards, and a one story full length porch with classically inspired columns.

432 East Mississippi, house. (1909) Contributing. This two story foursquare house has brick siding on the first story and asbestos shingles on the upper stories. The cross gable roof has wide overhanging eaves. The full length one story shed roof porch has brick columns on stone plinths. There is a one car non-contributing carport with vinyl siding in the gable end.

437 East Mississippi, house. (1887) Contributing. This Queen Anne style residence with asbestos shingles has cross gables on hip roofs. The hip roof front porch has paired square columns. The tall narrow windows have simple entablature surrounds. There is a contributing garage with gable roof and asbestos shingles.

438 East Mississippi, house. (1908) Contributing. This two-and-a-half story Gable-front house has brick veneer on the first story and narrow wood clapboards on the second. There are gable dormers on the east and west elevations, and a projecting oriel above the east side entrance.

448 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1906) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story gable-front residence has clapboard siding on the first story and wood shingles in the gable front end. The steeply pitched gable roof has triple windows with multi-pane upper sashes on the second story. The full length front porch has square wood posts supporting the flat roof. There is a cross gambrel bay on the east elevation.

449 East Mississippi, house. Contributing. This one-and-a-half story clapboard gable-front residence has multiple gable roofs breaking up the main roof, including a lower gable front entry bay with an extended roof on the east which covers the front entry. A gable roof dormer is on the east, as is a cross gable portion to the rear.

450 East Mississippi, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This two story clapboard house with limestone foundation has elements of the Queen Anne style, including the multiple roof lines with overhanging eaves, a Palladian window on the front elevation second story, and a projecting bay window beneath. There is a she roof addition to the east, and a 2/3's length front porch with classically inspired square columns. A gabled dormer is on the south slope.

119 North Missouri, house, (c. 1919) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a side gable roof which extends to cover the full length front porch. The porch supports are square paneled wood columns. A prominent shed roof dormer is on the front, and all roofs have wide overhanging eaves. Dentils accentuate the cornice of the main elevation and a belt course on the north and south. A gable roof screened-in secondary entrance has exposed rafters on the northeast. There is a contributing concrete block garage with gable roof and a contributing shiplap sided, hip roof outbuilding.

124 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1935) Contributing. This one story clapboard Colonial Revival style house (Cape Cod variant) has a side gable roof. The centered entrance has a pedimented portico supported by decorative brackets. Paired 6/6 windows flank the entry door. There is a gable roof one-car contributing garage with narrow clapboards to the rear.

Michigan Cleaners and Dryers; 125 N. Missouri, (c. 1915) Contributing. This one story brick commercial building sits on a high limestone foundation. It is decorated with brick and stone tile quoins, a vertical brick and limestone beltcourse, and brick and limestone patterning above fenestration. Fenestration is recessed with stone lintels and sills. Main entries have multi-pane lights and metal awnings. The parapet wall has been raised, and the buildings is presently used for apartments. There is a non-contributing two car, side gable roof garage with aluminum siding.

T. A. Dodge House; 132 N. Missouri. (1940) Contributing. This one story Colonial Revival style house (Cape Cod variant) has a brick veneer of Flemish bond. The side gable roof of the main portion features a centered entry with awning roof. This is flanked by multipane windows. A recessed bay on the south has a lower ridge gable roof, as does the open porch with Doric columns on the north.

135 N. Missouri, house. Non-contributing. A much altered two story hip roof house with limestone veneer on the first floor and wood shingle siding on the second. A non-contributing garage has a gable roof and aluminum siding.

Manley, Walter, house; 138 N. Missouri. (1941) Contributing. This one story Minimal traditional house has a cross gable roof with enclosed front porch. The double-hung windows are 6/1 or 4/1. The house has asbestos shingle siding. There is a contributing garage with gable roof and shiplap siding.

202 N. Missouri, house. (1945) Contributing. This one story Minimal traditional house has a cross gable roof with inset front porch on the front facing gable. There is an open porch on the south with lower side gable roof. The porch supports are trellis-like posts. Windows are multi-pane upper sash and have shutters.

210 N. Missouri, house. (1922) Contributing. This one story bungalow has a side gable roof which extends over the recessed front porch. The porch supports are square wood columns and it has simple square wood rails. There is a shallow shed roof dormer on the front. All roof eaves have exposed rafters. There is a contributing concrete garage with flat roof.

216 N. Missouri, house. (1924) Contributing. This one story gable front bungalow has clapboard siding and a gable front half-width porch with lower ridge on the south side of the front elevation. The porch supports are battered columns on brick piers, and there is a brick balustrade. Roof eaves have exposed rafters.

217 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1910) Contributing. This variant of the National folk pyramidal form has a truncated hip roof with slight overhang, and a centered front wall gable. A hip roof porch has classically inspired columns, and the windows have entablature surrounds. There is a gable roof one-car contributing garage with composition roof shingle siding.

222 N. Missouri, house. (1922) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story gable-front-&-wing house is a variant of 226 N. Missouri. The front gable has an extended slope which forms a shed roof for the porch set within the ell. The porch supports are paired turned columns set on limestone piers. There is a hip roof bay window on the front facing gable. There is a small contributing one car garage with gable roof and wood siding.

226 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1910) Contributing. Similar to 222 N. Missouri, this one-and-a-half story gable-front-&-wing has gable end returns, clapboard siding, and a small gable roof dormer. The flat roof porch set within the ell has classically inspired square columns.

227 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1955) Non-contributing. A one story Minimal Traditional house with steel siding.

230 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1922) Contributing. Possibly an older house moved to this site in 1922, this one story hall and parlor residence has asbestos siding and two gable roof dormers. The three quarter front porch has a flat roof with square wood columns. There is a one story rear addition. The windows have shaped lintels.

403 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has cross gable roofs on hip with moderate overhang. The asbestos clad house has a limestone foundation. The south gable end is a tripartite bay, and both gable ends have semi-circular attic windows.

409 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. A one story gable-front-&-wing house which contains decorative features of the Victorian era, such as the hip roof porch set within the ell which has turned porch posts and spindlework frieze. The gable ends have returns and arched attic windows. There is a one story addition to the rear.

414 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This two story Queen Anne house with asbestos siding has elements of the free classic variant, but retains the characteristically Victorian elements such as the asymmetrical composition utilizing a variety of forms. The compound roof has large overhanging eaves and gable end returns, and a veranda with second story balustrade extends almost the entire length of the principal east facade. The classical details include the carved paired brackets and entablature surrounds. Detailed spindlework and dropped pendants are centered in the eastern gable. The facade is further broken up by numerous bay windows.

417 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1896) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage is similar to others on N. Missouri. It has cross gable roofs on the main truncated hip portion. A mansard roof porch is set within the ell, and the porch supports are turned spindle. The front gable attic has a semi-circular window. The house has vinyl siding.

422 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This two story clapboard Queen Anne house has a highly irregular compound roof. The widely overhanging eaves of the steeply pitched roofs have a denticulated and bracketed cornice. The wrap around porch has a hip roof supported by classical Doric Columns on a brick balustrade.

423 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1898) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story gable-front-&-wing has elements of the Victorian era, including a wrap around front porch with turned spindle frieze, turned posts on the rear entry porch, and some window entablature surrounds. The hip roof porch has square wood columns and a gabled entry pediment.

430 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one story weatherboard Queen Anne cottage has a truncated hip roof with gable end and front gable wall dormer. The full length truncated hip roof porch has a half pyramidal entry pediment, turned spindle posts, and a jigsawn frieze.

431 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This gable-front-&-wing house variant has cross gable roofs with flared, overhanging eaves set on a hip roof. It has vinyl siding and a limestone foundation. The front porch set within the ell is non-historic and has a sunburst motif.

438 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. A one story gable-front-&-wing with asbestos siding which has Victorian era elements, such as a truncated hip roof porch set within the ell that has turned spindle posts and scrolled spandrels. The overhanging boxed eaves of the house have end returns. The tall windows have entablature surrounds.

439 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1912) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story clapboard side gable house has a one-half inset porch with rounded, neo-classic columns. A shed dormer is centered in the roof. Windows are tall and narrow with one-over-one sash.

444 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1906) Contributing. This two story foursquare house has vinyl siding, a limestone foundation, and a side gable roof with boxed eaves and a large front gable dormer. The one story flat roof porch has brick columns and a denticulated entablature. A veranda above has simple square wood railings.

445 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1885) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has a truncated hip main roof, with intersecting front gable and hip wing. The front gable has end returns, and the boxed overhanging eaves have paired decorative brackets. The vinyl sided house has a porch set within the ell that has simple square wood columns supporting the hip roof. Windows have entablature surrounds.

452 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1907) Contributing. This two story foursquare has a bellcast front gable roof with side gable dormers. The vinyl sided house has a three quarter length front porch with large square tapering columns on brick piers.

453 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This one story Queen Anne cottage has clapboard siding, and intersecting gable roof on a truncated hip. The overhanging eaves have end returns. The porch set within the ell has turned porch supports and carved balusters. There is a decorated lintel on the west facade.

458 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1907) Contributing. This two story foursquare has steeply pitched cross gable roofs with pedimented eaves overhanging the second story. The first story has limestone veneer, and the second has narrow wood clapboard. The front porch has a front gable roof and square stone porch columns.

459 N. Missouri, house, (c. 1900) Contributing. This one story bungalow has vinyl siding, a limestone foundation, and a side gable roof with wide overhanging eaves and exposed rafters. There is a large gable dormer on the front elevation. A one-half width inset porch with tapered square columns on brick piers has been enclosed.

Crawford house; 111 N. Water. (1909) Contributing. This two story brick foursquare has Prairie style influences, such as the tiled hip roof with wide overhanging eaves. The enclosed front porch wraps around one side. Windows vary, and include a semi-circular arched window flanking the entry porch. Windows have stone lugsills and lintels.

117 N. Water, house, (c. 1908) Contributing. This two story brick foursquare has a hip roof porch with hip roof dormers. The three-quarter length front porch has square brick columns and a brick balustrade. The windows have stone lugsills and lintels, and there is a rough-cut limestone foundation.

116-118 N. Water, duplex. (1925) Contributing. This two story duplex (now a commercial building) has a hip roof with widely overhanging eaves that extend in front to cover the two story colonnaded front porch. The porch has square wood columns and a wood railing on the second story. The clapboard building has a hip roof front dormer.

Taul, Soper, house. 124 N. Water. (1936) Contributing. Now serving as an office, this one-and-a-half story brick Tudor Revival house has the characteristic steeply pitched gables. The entry is located in the projecting gable bay at the northeast corner. The windows have multiple lights. An exterior brick chimney also dominates the front facade. There is a non-contributing two car garage with gable roof and stucco with false half-timbering to the rear.

Trimble, Judge Francis H., house. 125 N. Water, (c. 1895) Contributing. This two story house has the irregular roof line of the Queen Anne style, with its hip on hip roof with overhanging eave and wide plain cornice board. The first story has a stucco finish, and the second story is clapboard. Tall narrow windows also suggest the Victorian era. The hip roof porch has paired slender wood columns with turned spindle balusters.

133 N. Water, house, (c. 1880) Non-contributing. A much altered two story building with stucco and false half-timbering siding and dark sash windows.

134 N. Water, commercial building, (c. 1961) Non-contributing. A one story brick commercial building with flat roof and large plate glass windows.

139 N. Water, house, (c. 1880) Contributing. This one story double pen house has clapboard siding and a one story clapboard gable roof addition. The flat roof porch has tapered square wood columns. Decorated vergeboards, and paired tall, narrow windows are characteristic of the late nineteenth century.

202 N. Water, house. Contributing. The two story Prairie style house has brick veneer on the first story and stucco on the second. The low hip roof has very wide overhanging eaves, and wide hip eaves extend around from the front porch to also separate the first story from the second, further emphasizing the horizontal lines of the house. The porch has massive square brick columns, and a large exterior brick chimney pierces the roof eaves.

203 N. Water, house. Contributing. This two story Queen Anne residence has the highly irregular roof line typical of the style, with cross gables on hip. There is a three story circular tower at the southwest corner. The vinyl and wood sided house has a wrap around porch with hip roof and gabled pedimented entrance.

210 N. Water, house. Contributing. This Prairie style brick house is two stories, and has a hip roof with hip bay, dormer, and porch. All roofs have widely overhanging eaves, and the porch roof line is picked up again on the south bay of the house. The front porch has massive square brick columns. The main entry door has leaded glass sidelights.

211 N. Water, house. Contributing. This one-and-a-half story gable-front residence with asbestos siding has intersecting cross gable bays. The front facing gable has a semi-circular projecting eave. The full length shed roof porch has simple square columns. There are bellcast shed roof dormers on the side elevations.

216 N. Water, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This two story clapboard Queen Anne residence has the typically irregular compound roof, with a gable front bay set on a truncated hip roof, and additional hip roofs, one with a gablet, to the rear. All roofs are steeply pitched and have boxed overhanging eaves and end returns. There is a two story porch set within the front ell that has simple wood columns. There are brackets under the eaves, as well as under the cornice of the second story oriel window. A first story window has a large semi-circular transom, and several windows have stained and leaded glass panels. There are shingles in the front gable attic as well as a triangular attic window. A contributing wood shed with gable roof is to the rear.

Lightburne Hall; 301 N. Water. (1852) Contributing. Lightburne Hall is the most impressive and intact Greek Revival residence in Liberty. The two story symmetrically arranged, white-painted brick residence has a low pitched hip roof with overhanging eaves above a classical cornice band. The original entry (south elevation) has a two story pedimented portico supported by large square double columns at both end. Entry doors on both stories are double leaf with transoms and sidelights, and are set within tabernacle frames. The nearly square plan house has five ranked elevations. There is another entry door with broken pediment on the west elevation. Above, is a recessed window with a denticulated lintel, transom, and sidelights.

302 N. Water, house, (c. 1880) Contributing. This two story stucco house has design features reflective of the Victorian era, but with later alterations such as the Craftsman style porch. The truncated hip roof has a very widely projecting boxed eave with wide cornice band beneath. There is a gable dormer with boxed cornice extended from the cornice of the main roof; it has a triangular attic window. The wrap around front porch has massive square limestone columns. There is a bay window on the south side, and some windows have art glass top lights. A contributing one car stucco garage to the rear has a hip roof.

316 N. Water, house, (c. 1906) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Craftsman bungalow has a bellcast front gable roof with square carved eave decorations. There is shed roof dormer on the side elevation. The wall cladding is stone on the first story, and wood shingle with decorative half timbers on the gable end. The porch columns and three chimneys are heavily rusticated limestone. The extended front porch also have slender wood columns sitting on the limestone balustrade.

318 N. Water, house. Non-contributing. This is a modern, ranch house constructed after the original nomination was prepared.

319 N. Water, house, (c. 1895) Contributing. This two story brick house has the steeply pitched multiple roofs typical of the Queen Anne style--intersecting cross gables on hip. The roofs have overhanging boxed eaves and end returns. The attic walls on the gable ends are wood clapboard. The wrap around front porch has a shallow hip roof with square brick columns. The tall windows have stone lugsills and lintels. There is a contributing two-car stucco garage with gable roof to the rear.

325 N. Water, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Queen Anne residence with asbestos siding has steeply pitched cross gable roofs, a wrap around front porch with gable entry portico has a hip roof supported by classically inspired columns set on wood paneled plinths. Carved modillions are beneath the overhanging boxed eaves. Ornamental carved mullions separate five sash windows in the gable ends, which have are recessed in the attic gable end.

333 N. Water, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This Victorian era cottage is a rare Liberty example of the Shingle style. It has a very steeply pitched pyramidal roof over the front porch and front portion of the house, set on a hip roof rear portion, a conical roof is set on the southwest corner, where the front porch curves and wraps around to the side. The porch has classically inspired square posts and a denticulated cornice, which continues around the entire roof. The surface is highly textured with the square cut wood shingles.

337 N. Water, house, (c. 1890) Contributing. This two story Queen Anne residence has clapboard siding and the highly irregular compound roof typical of the style. There are gable roof projecting bays intersecting the truncated hip roof, and an irregular floor plan. There is a wide unadorned cornice band beneath the shallow projecting eaves, a five part, two story bay window in on the south. Windows are tall and narrow, and sometimes paired. No front porch remains.

338 N. Water, house. Non-contributing. A much altered two story residence with enclosed front porch and wood siding with brick and stucco and half-timbering.

St. James Church; 342 N. Water Street. 1913-1914. Contributing. This brick Gothic Revival church has a one story nave with parapet gable ends. The exterior of the nave walls are supported by buttresses capped with stone. Each bay is fenestrated by Gothic arched windows with stone keystones, a transept terminates in gablets with closed stone verges. The main elevation has a three story, sixty foot bell tower with couple piers at each corner, rising to a multi-spired pinnacle. Fenestration on the tower has large, stone Gothic arched windows with wooden tracery at the third level. The main entry has a stone Gothic arch. The building is presently used as a bed & breakfast inn.

415 Wilson, house, (c. 1910) Contributing This two story clapboard "Princess Anne" variant has the irregular roofline typical of the more high style Queen Anne, but features less detailing. The steeply pitched roofs are cross gable on hip; the gables end are flared and have pedimented eaves. There is a tripartite two story bay, and the front gable roof porch has classically inspired columns on stone piers.

419 Wilson, house. (1911) Contributing. This two story foursquare house has stone veneer on the first story and narrow wood clapboards on the second. The house has a bellcast hip roof, and there are hip roof dormers. The bellcast hip roof porch has massive stone columns and a stone balustrade. There is a gable roof, shiplap one car garage that is contributing.

Hester House; 424 Wilson. (1930) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story Tudor Revival house has the typical steeply pitched multiple gable roofs dominating the facade, including the gabled portico entry. There is brick cladding with stone accents on the first level, and the upper level is stucco. The arched windows have stone coping and keystones, a screened-in porch is on the southwest end, and an interior brick and stone chimney punctuates the flared eaves above.

429 Wilson, house. (1924) Contributing. This one-and-a-half story clapboard bungalow has a side gable roof which extends over the full-length front porch, which is supported in turn by massive stone columns. There is a prominent shed roof dormer on the front facade, and a shed roof oriel window with exposed rafters on the west.

441 Wilson, house, (c. 1905) Contributing. This two story clapboard foursquare has a hip roof with front hip roof dormer. Its three ranked facade has a full length flat roof front porch with classically inspired columns.

The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District in Liberty, Clay County, is significant under criteria A and C in the areas of Community Planning and Development and Architecture. In the area of Community Planning and Development, the district represents several aspects of the development patterns of residential neighborhoods in Liberty. Located north and east of the square, the neighborhood has retained its association over the years not only with the commercial center of Liberty, but with William Jewell College as well. The campus of William Jewell has served as a barrier to further growth to the east, just as the hills at approximately Doniphan and Gordon streets have prevented growth on the north. On the east side of the district, many of the houses were originally constructed for professors at William Jewell, and students have lived in this particular neighborhood for many decades. Some of the buildings in the district were themselves originally constructed for educational purposes. Additionally, William Jewell College has acquired several other buildings over the years and has changed their function to one associated with education. With the slow growth the city has experienced, the housing styles/types located within the district represent a wide time span, a typical feature of Liberty's Residential District property type. Buildings associated with three contexts, as defined in the amendment to the Multiple Property Submission, "Historic Resources of Liberty, Clay County, Missouri" (hereafter, "Liberty MPS"), are within the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District: Establishing a City: Liberty from 1817-1860. Stability vs. Growth: Residential Growth and the Real Estate "Boom." 1867-1896, and The "Bon ton" Suburban Community: Liberty from 1896-1946. With this wide variety of housing types constructed over a span of years, the district is also significant in the area of architecture with residences that represent the changing tastes, fashions, and construction methods in American architecture. The residences in the Jewell-Lightburne district represent the changing tastes, fashions, and construction methods in American architecture. The district includes several good examples of the large fashionable homes of the well-to-do, as well as the more modest National Folk type residences of the working class. In particular, it contains some of Liberty's best examples of the late nineteenth century and Victorian era residences, as well as two of its historic churches. The period of significance extends from the construction of the oldest house within the district, 1852, through 1946, the arbitrary fifty-year cut-off date.

Residential development in Liberty was originally centered around the courthouse square, and occasionally scattered on the main roads leading in and out of town. Most of the earliest residences were constructed in the areas west, north, and east of the courthouse square, which includes the proposed Jewell-Lightburne Historic District. At 240 contributing buildings, this is the largest proposed National Register historic district in Liberty; it naturally has buildings which represent nearly every period of architectural development found in Liberty. Located immediately adjacent to the north and west of the courthouse square, the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District housed many of Liberty's early prominent entrepreneurs. Major Alvan Lightburne was both a farmer and prominent businessman, and he located his house on N. Water on what was the edge of town at the time. He established a hemp factory there, and for many years a "rope-walk" was associated with his residence.[1] Eventually, the land surrounding his house was subdivided and other residents were attracted to the north hills overlooking the Courthouse Square.

E. Franklin and E. Kansas streets were east/west arteries which bounded the north and south sides of the square, respectively. Ending at William Jewell campus on the east, these streets were also desirable residential locations. In fact, many of the extant historic houses have replaced earlier historic residences, as these streets have retained their appeal over the years. The prominent hills at not only the William Jewell campus to the west, but at the north at approximately Doniphan street, served as both physical and visual terminuses to the district for many years. Jewell Hall, in particular, is visually prominent looking west from the courthouse square area.

During the period defined by the context Stability vs. Growth: Residential Growth and the Real Estate "Boom." 1867-1896, there was a flurry of activity in the city in addition and subdivisions platting. Lightburne's 1st Addition of 1883 divided up the large farm of Major Alvan and Ellen Lightburne. Also platted north and east of the square were Brown's M. B. Subdivision (1887) and Alien & Burns Addition (1887). A number of houses were built in these newly platted lots, varying from the exquisite shingle style home at 333 N. Water to the Queen Anne cottage at 422 N. Leonard noted for its prominent wood corner "quoins." Larger Queen Anne residences were built as well, such as the brick Stone-Yancey O'Dell Home at 421 N. Lightburne, which retains two historic porches, brackets, denticulated cornice band, and iron roof cresting. The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District has several buildings from this boom period of residential construction located at the extreme edges of the district, indicating that these neighborhoods may have been among the more popular in Liberty at this time. Platting continued in the district at a drastically reduced pace during the early part of the historic context The "Bon ton" Suburban Community: Liberty from 1896-1946. The Jewell Addition was platted in 1898.

Due to proximity of the William Jewell campus, the district has contained the residences of many of that college's professors as well as students over the years. As noted in a 1930s city planning report prepared by Hare & Hare, city planners and landscape architects, there were inadequate dormitory facilities at the college, and many of the out-of-town students were housed in private homes, boarding houses and fraternity and sorority houses.[2] A map accompanying this report shows that the vast majority of student boarders were located in the Jewell-Lightburne area, primarily east of N. Lightburne. Several of the larger homes in the district have been adapted over the years for rental apartments, and two fraternity houses were also constructed here.

Containing 240 contributing buildings within its boundaries, the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District has residences which represent nearly every period of architectural development found in Liberty. In addition to large Victorian era residences noted, more modest homes are evident throughout the district as well. The modest late nineteenth and early twentieth century residences are typical of standardized "plan book" homes, where the contractor or home owner took inspiration (or in many instances, ordered the plans directly) from the lumberyard, magazines, or architectural catalogues. A few residences in the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District spring from even more humble roots, and represent both the pre-and post-railroad building trends discussed in Virginia & Lee McAlester's A Field Guide to American Houses.[3]

The earliest remaining houses in the district are examples of the Greek Revival style. In addition to the fully executed, high style Lightburne Hall, the Jewell-Lightburne district contains some modest but significant Greek Revival buildings, such as the Moses Lard house at 470 E. Mill. The Rev. Lard was a leader and founder of many Christian Churches in Clay County, The classical detailing on the one-story frame cottage is evident of his knowledge and preference for this style.

During the period defined by the context Stability vs. Growth: Residential Growth and the Real Estate "Boom." 1867-1896, the majority of houses constructed were of the Queen Anne style. There is one Gothic Revival house in the district at 214 E. Mississippi, and a few Italianate, but the Queen Anne style and its variants is by far the preferred style of the period. This, in part, reflects the period of Liberty's fastest growth-the "boom" of the 1880s. The Queen Anne style was at its height then, while the Gothic Revival and the Italianate were on the wane.

Many vernacular National folk housing types were constructed as well. The gabled ell, or gable-front-&-wing, was a style commonly constructed in Liberty which often had Victorian era architectural features added. 128 N. Leonard is an excellent example of the gable-front-&-wing form with elaborate porch details and corner scrolled brackets added.

The predominate housing types constructed in the Jewell/Arthur district during the early part of the historic context The "Bon ton" Suburban Community: Liberty from 1896-1946 were foursquares and bungalows, which typically has Prairie and Craftsman style features. A few decades later, the Colonial Revival and Tudor Revival styles were more predominant, but these buildings were not constructed in great numbers. A review of the 1924 Sanborn map reveals why: the majority of lots in the Jewell-Lightburne Historic District contained buildings by this date. The district had essentially acquired the character it retains today--that of a small town residential area which has experienced slow but steady growth of the years, revealing a variety of building types, styles, and construction dates.

Some buildings in the district changed from their original function during the early twentieth century. William Jewell College has acquired a number of buildings on the east side of the district, many through donations. Several large houses were converted to apartments. Indeed, the need for rental housing units brought about the construction of the first apartment building in Liberty, the Romona apartments on N. Leonard. Most of the early twentieth century apartment buildings were located close to the square. There these buildings were in close distance to both the commercial center of town and the campus of William Jewell. Other multi-family buildings constructed during this period included duplex units, which generally featured a colonnaded facade having separate porches for the units on each floor.

The Jewell-Lightburne Historic District, due to its long period of residential construction, is thus associated with many of the contextual periods defined in the amendment to the Liberty MPS. With buildings from nearly every period of construction in the city's history, it not only serves as a physical reminder of the slow, steady growth of the community influenced by various physical and economic factors, but serves as an architectural textbook of Liberty housing styles as well. Its development is particularly tied to that of the William Jewell college, and it contains some of the best examples of Victorian era housing in Liberty.

NOTES:

  1. Ethel Massie Withers, editor, Clay county Missouri Centennial Souvenir, 1822-1922 (Liberty, MO: Liberty Tribune, 1922) p. 13.
  2. Hare & Hare, City Planners, "A City plan for Liberty, Missouri," Report of the City Planning Commission, 1930-1934.
  3. Virginia & Lee McAlester, A Field Guide to American Houses (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984), pp. 88-101.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

City Plat Maps, Liberty, Missouri, City Hall (microfilm copies).

Edwards Brothers. An Illustrated Historical Atlas of Clay County, Missouri. Philadelphia: Edwards Brothers, 1877.

Hare & Hare, City Planners. "A City Plan for Liberty, Missouri." Report of the City Planning Commission, 1930-1934.

History of Clay and Platte Counties, Missouri. St. Louis: National Historical Company, 1885.

Jackson, Don M. The Heritage of Liberty: A Commemorative History of Liberty, Missouri. Liberty: R.C. Printing Service, 1975.

McAlester, Virginia & Lee. A Field guide to American Houses. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.

Missouri Office of Historic Preservation Architectural/Historic Inventory Survey Forms. Liberty City Hall.

Sanborn Map for Liberty, Clay County, Missouri. New York: Sanborn Map company, 1882, 1889, 1894, 1899, 1906, 1913, & 1924.

Withers, Ethel Massie, ed. Clay County Missouri Centennial Souvenir: 1822-1922. Liberty, MO: Liberty Tribune. 1922.

Wolfenbarger, Deon. "Historic Resources of Liberty, Clay County, Missouri. National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation Form and amendment.

Wolfenbarger, Deon. "Liberty Survey Summary Report." September 1987.

Woodson, W. W. History of Clay county, Missouri. Topeka: Historical Publishing, Company, 1920.

Deon Wolfenbarger (Three Gables Restoration), Carolyn Funk (City of Liberty) and Steven E. Mitchell (Missouri Department of Natural Resources), Dougherty-Prospect Heights Historic District, Clay County MO, nomination document, 2000, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, DC.

Jewell-Lightburne Historic District Map

Street Names
Franklin Street East • Jewell Street North • Jewell Street South • Kansas Street East • Laura Street • Leonard Street North • Lightburne Street North • Mississippi Street East • Missouri Street North • Water Street North

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