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Sewickley Borough

Sewickly Borough Hall is located at 601 Thorn Street, Sewickley PA 15143; phone: 412-741-4015.

Beginnings [1]

The borough was incorporated July 6, 1853. The first house within the borough limits was situated between Park Place hotel and the river, and was owned by George Ulery. When the railroad was opened there was also a group of houses along Beaver Road, several of which were used as hotels. Thomas Hoey owned a farm of three hundred acres, the eastern boundary of which was the present Division Street of the borough, then known as "Graveyard Lane." The triangular portion of this farm inclosed [sic] by Beaver, Division and Fife Streets was sold to John R. Garrison, the first merchant of the borough, in 1837. He built several houses, and laid off that part of his land adjoining the Beaver road into lots, the sale of which was not rapid; but thus the growth of the town began. The Hoey estate was divided among the three children of Mr. Thomas Hoey — John Hoey, Mrs. Fife, and Mrs. Thorn, the wife of the Rev. Charles Thorn. Messrs. Gray and Chadwick laid out the principal streets of the borough on that part of the property which came into possession of Mrs. Thorn (south of Beaver street and east of a small stream which flows through the borough). Their purchase from Thorn resulted in legal complications, and was finally set aside, but the streets as laid out were confirmed. That portion of the town south of Beaver Street and west of the stream referred to was sold by John Hoey to John H. Little, by whom it was subdivided. East of Division street the land was originally owned by a Mr. Peebles, from whom it passed to Rev. Robert Hopkins, by whom it was laid out and subdivided into lots. It is not often that clergymen have been identified with the interests of a town to the extent apparent in this instance.

The growth of the town has been influenced solely by its advantages as a place of residence, it being one of the most delightful suburban localities in the country. No effort has ever been made to introduce manufactures, and the local business interests are not extensive. A large proportion of the population do business in the city, and during the day the town appears almost deserted. A different aspect is presented as the evening trains arrive. The general appearance of the town and its residences is indicative of wealth and culture. Many of the streets are wide, well shaded and macadamized, and the dwellings are generally of a character fitted to bear the closest scrutiny as to design, finish and surroundings. The hills in the background greatly enhance the attractiveness of the town as a whole.

**Information is curated from a variety of sources and, while deemed reliable, is not guaranteed.
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