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Whitestown Town

Whitestown Town Hall is located at 8539 Clark Mills Road, Whitesboro NY 13492; phone: 315-736-1131.

Beginnings [1]

In 1784, along with others, Hugh White of Middletown, Connecticut, purchased the Sadaquada Patent which included 6,000 acres of land. (This patent had been granted in 1736 and during the Revolutionary War had been confiscated by New York State since its holder was a Loyalist.) The new owners divided the land among themselves by lot. Upon the 1,500 acres which he drew, which were located south of the Mohawk River in present-day Whitestown, Hugh White settled in 1784. He brought his sons with him that year, and they cleared land and built a cabin. The following winter, Hugh White brought his wife and other children by sleigh from Connecticut.

In 1788, within the County of Montgomery, the Town of Whitestown was set off from the Town of German Flatts. This new town, named for Hugh White, included all the land in New York State from the northern boundary to the southern boundary, west of Utica. Then in 1798, Oneida County was established and Hugh White was appointed a Judge of Common Pleas and County Courts. Courts were held at a schoolhouse in Whitesboro.

In 1801, Hugh White deeded about one acre of land to Oneida County for a site for a Court House and Jail. This concern for a permanent and separate facility that would represent government in Oneida County was, probably, of the improvements that Hugh White felt would attract other settlers to the area.

Oneida County was authorized by New York State in 1803 to hold court at Rome and Whitesboro, and in 1806, by an act passed on April 2, 1806, Oneida County was authorized to raise $4,000 to build a Court House at Rome and one at Whitesboro. The Court House at Whitesboro was completed in 1807.

The land upon which the Court House was built reverted, through a technicality, to the heirs of Hugh White, and in 1860, Philo White, a grandson of Hugh White, re-donated the site to the community.

After fifty years, the courts were moved to Utica.

  1. Virginia B. Kelly, Oneida County Historian, Whitestown Town Hall, nomination document, 1972, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.
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