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Plymouth Charter Township


Plymouth Charter Township municipal offices are located at 9955 North Haggerty Road, Plymouth, MI 48170; phone: 734-453-3840.

Originally settled in 1824, Plymouth became a township in 1827. At that time, the boundaries of Plymouth Township encompassed areas which are now Canton Township, the City of Plymouth, and Northville Township. In fact, Canton Township used to be unofficially known as "South Plymouth," until it became an independent township in 1834. The City of Plymouth and Northville Township became independent jurisdictions in 1867 and 1898, respectively. Plymouth Township later became a charter township on April 19, 1977.

For many years, Plymouth Township was an agricultural and logging community with grist and saw mills forming the major industry. In 1871, the construction of the railroad encouraged industrial growth in the community and, with the turn of the century, manufacturing operations began to emerge. In 1938, the Burroughs Corporation constructed a large plant on Plymouth Road, which is still in use. The construction of the freeways in the 1970's further expanded the potential for industrial growth, and facilitated Plymouth Township's rise as the prime location for research, development, and technology that it is today. Over time, the Township has transitioned from an agricultural community to a suburban community with a strong foundation of high-quality housing, and opportunities in business, industry, and technology.

During the 1960's through the 1980's, Plymouth Township experienced substantial growth, along with an increasing demand for housing. In 1966, approximately 74% of the land in the Township was designated as agricultural or undeveloped. By 1990, this amount had been reduced to approximately 36%. In 2014, Plymouth Township is considered to be a mostly "built-out" community. Over the years, Township leaders have strived to enact zoning and land use policies that would lead to a logical and orderly development pattern. The challenge that now faces the Township is to ensure that the redevelopment of outdated sites will fit into the context of the existing environment. The goals and policies stated in the Township Master Plan for Land Use are critical for maintaining the Township's image as a desirable community in which to live, work, and recreate.

  1. Charter Township of Plymouth, Master Plan for Land Use, 2015, www.plymouthtwp.org, accessed August, 2015.
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