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Maryland



Henry McCauley Farm, ca. 1830/1850, Ditto Farm Regional Park, Mount Aetna Road, near Hagerstown, MD, National Register

Photo: Henry McCauley Farm, ca. 1830/1850, Ditto Farm Regional Park, Mount Aetna Road, near Hagerstown, MD. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Photographed by User:Acroterion (own work), 2013, [cc-by-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons, accessed February, 2014.


  • Capitol: Annapolis
  • Largest City: Baltimore
  • Nickname: Old Line State
  • State Bird: Baltimore Oriole
  • State Tree: White Oak
  • State Flower: Black-Eyed Susan
  • State Motto: "Fatti Maschii, Parole Femine" Manly Deeds, Womanly Words

Maryland ("Terra Maria") is named for the wife of England's King Charles I, Queen Henrietta Maria. It was the name of the charter issued by the King in 1632 to the first Baron Baltimore (George Calvert) for establishing a new Province. During the preparation of the official charter, Lord Baltimore died, thus it was ultimately issued to his son, Caecilius (Cecil) Calvert. But it was Cecil's younger brother Leonard who actually led the first two ships (the Arc and the Dove) of settlers to the new Province of Maryland, where they landed in March, 1634. The first group of more than 200 founded the town of St. Mary's and attempted to establish a feudal system. Resistance prevented this from occurring and by 1638 a Colonial Assembly was governing according to the laws of England.

Some historians assert that Maryland's nickname, "Old Line State," was bestowed by George Washington in reverence of its regular line troops, the Maryland Line, who served with distinction and made important contributions and sacrifices in many revolutionary battle engagements.

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